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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wow, it has been almost a year since I bought my herd of Boer goats and I have learned so much and come so far. When we first got our girls they were wild as March hares. I would run them through the cattle chute and catch them with the calf head catch in order to worm them and doctor them. Now they just go into their feeding pen and one by one I collar them and do what needs to be done. Most walk up willingly some need to be coaxed and one....well she is a mind reader. She is an older doe and always stands back to watch from afar. She never comes in for grain if I am even looking at the girls thinking about when they were last wormed! How does she know? I love to see jar standing ou ther "hiding" behind one of the spools or standing waaaayyy on the other side of the pen and carefully keeping as far away from me as possible. And yet, any other time and she sneaks up behind me when I am handing out treats, stretches as far as she can, and takes the treats running away. Silly girl.

We immediately had to deal with CL when the girls arrived. Had a vet test the abscess and culled the offending doe when it came back positive. I was devastated and almost gave up on the goats right away, but pressed on and have not had any more CL problems since.

We have dealt with bloat, scary kiddings, selling some of those cute babies, selling a much loved, but inferior buck, and survived it all.

I bought a new buck, who is a spoiled rotten brat. I am in the process of retraining him and he is doing well. He thought I was to be treated like all the other goats and he used to try to push me around by running in front of me and hooking me with his horns. By the way that hurts....a lot. He has learned that that ends badly for him. He has had his feet taken out from under him, had his ears pulled, been sprayed on the face. None of that phased him. I have learned to have buck pens that do not require me to get in with the buck on a regular basis. But, I have learned to carry a hot shot when I do have to go in. It only took two well timed touches and my buck is now very polite and easy to work with. And he is still a big love who just wants to be scratched.

I have learned how to trim feet....well, actually that is still in progress. I have figured out that I can't do it "by eye" and learned to use calipers to measure. It's coming along. I learned about nutrition and how much more there is to know about nutrition. I have learned that children and goats are a great match! My human kids get so much out of caring for the goats and having them in our lives. 4H has been a great challenge for us. Oh my goodness so much to learn.

Oh and speaking of challenges, how about learning about conformation, and wethers vs. show goats! Yikes! Genetics, bloodlines, breeders...I want to buy an excellent buck, but don't feel qualified to pick him out! LOL.

I could probably go on for hours about what all I have learned this year. One of the most important things I have learned is how to find a community of goat lovers who are friendly and willing to help those of us who are stumbling around lost. What an awesome place TGS is and such knowledgable members. I have learned so much from you and been entertained by your stories and pictures.

Thank you all! May all your journeys be as joyous and fruitful as mine has been so far!
 

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Crazy Goat Lady
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Well, I've been at this for a bit longer, got my first goats in "06. Immediately dealt with Goat Polio! Had the 2 c-sections, and then found TGS. So, now, I'm feeding better and not having as many HUGE kids! And, I've become "quite the little mid-wife" as my DIL says. Everybody holds their breath when I "go in", and cheers when I bring out a living kid. I've bonded with my Granddaughter, during these births, and she loves the animals.

We continue to improve our herd, mostly by acquiring some quality bucks. And, keeping the doelings that we feel can improve our herd. However, the "old girls", our first NDG's are still here and always will be. They were wild as "march hares" when we got them, but, have become old friends.

For awhile this year I was wondering if I still had the desire to continue with our goat enterprise...maybe my age and arthritis were "getting to me", for a minute. Since then, and thanks to you all, I was given a "second wind". So, we will continue to work toward a future with these wonderful animals.

So, now I am going to go out and trim some toes! :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm glad you rediscovered your desire for these great creatures! They have sure been a blessing for me!
 

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It's so amazing to think back and remember where it all started. Growing up we had pet goats, mostly pygmy and nigie scrub goat crosses, but recently I took a dive into dairy goats....I gotta tell you, they've given me a run for my money some days. If this site hadn't been here, I would've probably thrown in the towel when our princess Raina was taken by enterotoxemia and bloat. Now I've got six darlings, 1 buck, 2 wethers, and 1 doe and 2 doelings. I feel like my adventure has just begun, but boy am I excited. I'm just so glad that I have somewhere to share my goaty adventures without getting looked at crossways! And of course, I stalk the forum sharing in y'all's joys and heartbreaks. I wouldn't trade it for anything. :)
 
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