The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello-
I'm sorry for the off topic (it's not really goat related) but I was wondering if you know if goldenrod is toxic to horses and if they will eat it or just automatically stay away from it. My whole pasture is not finished yet but before we put animals in it I'm going to see if there is toxic plants. The whole thing is clover and goldenrod. :( I'm not sue if mowing will do any good if the plant is toxic :cry:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Some clovers can cause problems for horses. I have red clover, which can cause slobbers. It only seems to bother one of my horses, who can eat it dry in hay without any problem just not green.

Also IIRC it seems that frost damaged clover can be a problem.

Alsike clover is toxic to horses.

A list I just checked listed goldenrod as toxic to horses.

Horses may avoid toxic plants if there is ample other food available, if not they are more likely to eat toxic plants.

Hope this helps.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
849 Posts
Hey, sorry for taking so long to reply. I've been out of town for the past week. I know that goldenrod is poisonous to horses, but I pastured my horses in a field full of the stuff for a couple of years with no problem at all. They simply avoided it. Most horses will stay away from toxic plants (especially ones as "yucky" as goldenrod) as long as they have plenty of other food available. The best thing you can do is to get your pasture mowed as soon as possible and then mow it again next spring before the goldenrod gets big. Keep it mowed 2-4 times throughout the summer and fall and the goldenrod will disappear.

I've never known clover to be a problem except that it makes horses fat and slobbery. It might also be too rich if your horse is an easy keeper, making him prone to founder. Mowing doesn't discourage clover since it grows close to the ground, but mowing does help the grass grow, which can cut down on your pasture's clover content as the grass moves in. Clover may not hurt him, but grass is generally a healthier choice for pasture forage so you want to encourage it to grow.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top