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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We do a lot with our milk...something different every week, and we're always trying something new. I thought I'd start a thread for what we're doing and how it worked out. Please don't let this become a platform for the discussion of raw vs. pasteurized milk...I use both for different reasons. My goal is to maintain a thread to pass along some inspiration, lab reports, and methods for new-to-dairy and old hands alike, as well as to ask for suggestions and input when necessary. I've only been at "dairying" for three years, but in that time I've made yogurt, labneh (yogurt cheese or quark), cottage cheese, farmer's cheddar, fromage, chevre, feta, soap and failed misearbly, repeatedly at mozzerella and paneer (you know...the EASY cheese!).

Anyhow...I hope everyone enjoys the thread. If you have a question related to the post (that is not raw vs. pasteurized related) feel free to post it. If you have other questions, psend me a private message and I will try to provide an answer if I can. I am not an expert, just an avid experimenter who lives and learns and laughs my way along.

This week in milk...I'm copying over from another post my method for prepping my milk to drink (if pasteurizing) and make stuff with. If I an drinking it raw, I stop at filtering, but then I pre-sterilize my storage jars with steam first.

Here's what we DO with out fresh milk...

I stovetop pasteurize as I have a very young child who has regular tummy troubles. Here's what I do...I bring all my milk straight in, filter it through a milk filter (small one) from Caprine supply ...looks like a funnel with a disposeable pad in it... and put it right in the fridge. Once I have a gallon or more I get out two stainless pots, one that nests in side the other and make a double boiler (by putting a couple inches of water inside the bottom pot that sits on the stove). I then put my thermometor, stir spoon, anything else I will be using if I make cheese and any jars I will store the milk in into the inner pot, add an inch of water and cover with a lid. I bring this to a boil. The idea is to sterilize everything you use because if you are making cheese...it WILL mold later if you don't. Once the equipment is steamed for a few minutes I turn down the heat and use canning tongs to lay it on a clean towel or baking rack and dump the water out of the inner pot. I then pour my milk into the inner pot and start at medium heat, stirring regularly. The goal is to bring the milk to 165 degrees fairly quickly without scalding it. I fill the sink with ice and a little water. Once the milk hits 165 I hold it there for 30 seconds, then turn off the stove. I set the pot in the sink with ice in it to cool it down. If you are making yogurt or cheese, the instruction will tell you what temp. the milk needs to be before you add your cultures. Otherwise, for drinking milk, you really want to bring the temp. of the milk down FAST to preserve the taste and as many proteins as possible. Just putting it in the fridge will take hours to cool. I have set the whole pot in the chest freezer when I've had to run once it's cooled below 120. Yes you kill good bacteria, but if you are making cheese or cultured milk products, you will reculture the milk with good bacteria. You will damage the proteins some but not nearly as much as ultra pasteurized milk. It's a choice. I occasionally enjoy a glass of raw milk myself...but everyone has to decide on their own. This is still WAY better than store bought...and it works.
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Note...you can pasteurize low temp at 145 degrees BUT you have to hold at 145 for 30 minutes. I find my milk tastes cooked when I do this, vs. NOT cooked when I go to 165 fast and cool it VERY FAST. I also find that raw milk curdles in my coffee where cooked milk doesnt.

Look for more next week in milk. Cheers!

Erin
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a simple white cheddar (probably because annatto was hard to come by) that is also crumblier because it isn't "cheddared" as long (cheddaring cheese involves slicing a cheese and stacking it in offset layers between pressing.)
 
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