The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Looking at other currently available saddles I see the cross bucks are angled rather than straight up and down. And the side boards are contoured rather than a rectangle. Boy this is a hard decision as to just get a new finished saddle from either of the makers I can find on line is cheaper than buying this one, but this one comes with panniers.

I sew, have 2 commercial machines. I have rolls of water resistant cordura in many colors & strapping, heavy thread, dee rings, bulk zipper, etc. I can easily make my own panniers. Still that is not as easy as buying already made..... LOL Or I can use cheap substitutes for panniers for now.

What to do!?!?!

Any thoughts on this saddle verses currently offered saddles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I passed on a saddle similar to that one for $45 bucks.
Because I did not like the flat plywood that sat on the goat.

Of course the one I was looking at did not have panniers.

I have been useing those soft sided cooler bags for panniers.
Or horse saddle bags.

You did not say what they were asking for the set up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks RYORKIES!

They are asking about 3 times as much as the one you passed up on.

Besides the boxy non-contoured side boards.... I'm wondering why all the cross bucks I see on newer saddles are angled?

Is it for load stability, load capacity, goat comfort, or ???

I think I'm going to have to pass. The price just isn't good enough to justify going with outdated technology in packgoat saddle design.

I almost just jumped on it without waiting for feed back. It's hard to be patient when you want to start now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
IceDog said:
I'm thinking of buying this "like new" saddle any thoughts, on quality, value? Hard wood?

[attachment=0:rl2h29wb]pack saddle.jpg[/attachment:rl2h29wb]

Thanks!
Our 4-H packgoat group owns two of these exact saddles. I think the quality of the construction is good. However, I do not like the design at all. Things I don't like are primarilyy the carpet "cushion" and the flat side-boards. These *will* rub your coat and result in discomfort and possibly even cause injury. I "inherited" mine so was worth some time and investment to modify a bit to make them suitable for at least light loads. Otherwise, I think you'd be better off spending just a few dollars more and going with a Northwest Packgoat kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Otherwise, I think you'd be better off spending just a few dollars more and going with a Northwest Packgoat kit.
Thanks Brian, just the info I was looking for!

They actually want more than the Northwest Finished Wood Saddle! The only real benefit was that it included panniers.

But my goats' comfort is much more important than saving a few dollars so I've decided to pass.

My goats thank you all for helping me to avoid making a mistake that will cause them discomfort.

Thank you, thank you!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay how about the Targhee Pack Saddle.....

http://www.getyourgoatgear.com/saddles.html

They're just up the road from me so I could drive up and pick up my saddle. Big bonus! And the price is a lot less than the "like new" used saddle I was looking at.

Anyone have any experience with them?

The Targhee doesn't have the angled cross bucks for "additional topload space", but it would get me started!

And I still plan to buy the Northwest Comfort Fit in the hopefully near future! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay I think I'm just going to go with the 'Saddle Kit' from Northwest. I didn't think I could finish one but I decided if I could 'wax' the wood with my wood wax from Ashford....I can do that. Just sanding to make it smooth....all the beveling is already done, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
Hello,

don't get discouraged to buy the saddle kit from Northwestern. You need a rasp/file, some sanding paper, wood glue and a screw driver.

The bevelling is almost done, you'll only have to "break" the sawn edges with a file. Then sanding, glueing the crossbucks (how to do that is described in the manual that's been sent out with the saddles), fitting the straps and either oiling or waxing or whatever you want to use as finish.

Not counting the time for the glue to dry, this is done in about one hour.

Re. the straight crossbucks: crossbucks that angle outwards put more stability into the panniers (they don't sag in the middle)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Sabine!

I'd tried to contact Northwest yesterday to get just those questions answered.

Today I'll try to contact them to order the saddle!

I was thinking it would need to be coated with some type of polyurethane, which I didn't want to do. But I can oil or wax it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I bought the hardwood kit.

You will need some exterior glue.
Tite II.

I did not use a rasp. I had one of those
Mouse palm sanders with a pointy tip. It worked
well.

Get it at ACE or smaller hardware store.
That way you can buy a smaller bottle.

I used a exterior polyurathane. Never even
thought of useing oil. But then again. Oil
needs to be redone every year. I am too lazy for
that. I also sealed all the saddle before I reassembled it.
I also customized it by burning it.

Order the pad when you order the saddle.

On the used saddle. You could make them a offer for the
panniers. Hey all they can say is NO.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Redena! Love your saddle!

So after talking to NW this morning I decided I probably should really go with their Finished Saddle.

Which leads me to I thinking I should just go the extra $$$ for the Custom Fit.

Then I end up with way more $$$ than I can afford right now due to some unexpected expenses.

So I come back to the Saddle Kit.

I'm just intimidated by the whole proper polyurethane application process!

And the indecision continues! :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
Hello,

I'm using the Northwest saddles for 5-6 years now. I haven't oiled or waxed a single one of them and depending on how often we go on hikes during the year, they get exposed to some rain, some heat, some moisture during the year. They don't show any sign of wear. I keep them in a dry place with moderate temperature and moisture when I store them, nothing more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
IceDog said:
I'm just intimidated by the whole proper polyurethane application process!
What about this intimidates you? It really doesn't have to be that hard. My 12 year old daughter pretty much completed hers with minimum supervision from me ... her favorite part was picking the colors (we used a color wood stain) and applying the polyurethane. We stained and then masked off the areas to receive glue and then hung the parts from wire coat hangers, which were hung on hooks in our garage. This allowed us to easily turn them while we sprayed them with spray-can polyurethane. We did sand with very fine between-coat sand-paper and did I think 3 or 4 coats. Turned out beautifully I think.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
If I remember right. The can of exterior polyurathane
says you do not have to sand between coats if you spray
with in certain time frame. So that makes it even easier.

I enjoyed customizing mine with the burning. even though
I love the custom fit saddle pad. I do not get to see most of
the burn marks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My worry about applying the polyurethane is in my experience if you don't apply it correctly (coats too thick?) that it pops loose from a slight impact. I have no experience with spray polyurethane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
IceDog said:
My worry about applying the polyurethane is in my experience if you don't apply it correctly (coats too thick?) that it pops loose from a slight impact. I have no experience with spray polyurethane.
Ah ... don't worry about it. Use spray, and multiple light coats and you will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I would have to add my support to the "don't worry, you can do it..." side.

I just finished a pair of NW economy saddle kits and they turned out great. Being a bit anal I went with the economy kit just to save weight. I reason that the spruce bucks are plenty strong for the weights that a goat can carry, so no need for oak. The only real advantage to oak is that it is slightly more weather resistant.

So that being said I went for the lightest saddle with the most durable finish. After just completing a wood sea kayak, I learned a bit about durable finishes. If you can make wood last in the ocean for decades - a similar finish on a goat saddle will last forever - regardless of the type of wood underneath.

Being a bit anal and having a tendency to over do things, my saddles now have two coats of marine epoxy, and three coats of marine varnish. They look beautiful and I am confident that is the last time I will ever have to mess with them.

But, I would suggest that for the best finish, for the least skill and effort, I would suggest as above, that you rasped the edges, sand the wood, finish with 3 coats of exterior polyurathane with UV protection (don't get the cheap stuff, you only want to do this once). Sand between coats, regardless of what the directions say, with 220 grit sandpaper; then glue with exterior wood glue like gorilla glue. I think its easier to pre-assemble, hang and spray than to mask off the glue areas, but either works. You might have to cut apart the joints after finishing with a box cutter if you pre-assemble, but its not that hard then you just screw and glue and you are done.

Hope that helps.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top