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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are everyone's thoughts on worming and worm prevention? By that I mean does anyone else think it's better to just worm as needed rather than do regular worming or herbal wormers? And, does anyone rotate fields as another way to avoid worm issues? Really I would be just interested in anyone's take on worm prevention and stuff I'm just looking for peoples personal experiences.

My mother just started looking at the state of MD's studies on goats and worms and said they noted that constantly rotating fields helped to prevent worms. I don't know of a single goat breeder in my area or outside of my area that even does that though and none of them seem to have any issues.. They just worm as needed and that's it.

I feel like it's a little overkill for us to divide up 8 nice and open acres into tiny patches for the sake of rotation. I like for the animals to have a lot of open space and be as free as possible. But, my mom and I are kind of butting heads on it now because she thinks this must by the only way to keep everybody happy and healthy. :hair:

What does everyone think though?
 

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i think you have to weigh the cost of fence against the cost of just worming when needed. it takes alot of wormer (which you will still have to have on hand) to pay for any kind of fence that will keep goats in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
That is a good point. It's not hard for me to just keep safeguard on hand but it would be difficult and expensive to have my fencing guy come and divide everything up.

I feel like the findings of the study make sense but it's not exactly practical.
 

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Field rotation is very good for the pasture...cause the goats will eat only their favs and then that will disappear. When in a smaller space, they tend to eat everything down more evenly. I plan to rotate as we can afford to put up fencing...also some will just be electric divisions (cheaper). I also have other animals which will help the eating be more even...
 

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There's not enough space here for rotation. Basically mine are dry lotted & hay is fed up off the ground.
Its when they eat off short pasture you run into problems.
We worm twice a year & they might not even need the first one.

eta; our set up & climate is probably different than yourn.
 

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Well, I have 4 fields now, with 3-4 more to go. However, right now I have them running in 3 pastures, so they can come and go as they please. In the winter they are in the pasture by the barn, unless it isn't raining and I have the day off and lead them around. I have sheep too that tend to do the actual mowing, although my 10 goats try to keep up:) I am relatively new to goats, and really only one of my girls had a horrible worm load, and I treated her. The others seem to be fine. I will worm them going into winter though, since they will mainly just be in the one pasture, but I will with positive pellets since most I think are expecting. I think I'll just worm when needed though for the most part, checking eyelids and gums etc:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Interesting, thanks for the input everyone!

Right now I have 5 acres which are split in half. The gates open right now though in the center so they have the run of both fields. Because of the horses the grass is short in some places and long in others but the goats prefer the long weeds the horses ignore. I think the whole rotating to prevent worms thing= makes sense but it sounds like a lot more work than needed.. And it still can't garuntee they won't get any worms or insure I won't need to worm them ever. Or at least that's how I feel. Maybe it's just smarter to keep up my herbal wormer or worm as needed.
 
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