Tiny udder = little milk? - Embarrassing pics added

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by Epona142, May 13, 2009.

  1. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    One of our does (Rudy) is smaller than the rest. She had her first kids this year and the surviving one went home a couple weeks ago.

    Well, I've been milking her own even though she has a little udder, simply because I don't care if its a cup or a gallon, you're going to contribute if you live here! :greengrin:

    I'd just been milking her right after Hope and putting it together, and I sort of go on auto-pilot when I milk and think about things.

    Well I noticed that the amount I was getting was quite a bit, so I decided to keep it separate and see how much I was getting from each doe.

    And Rudy gave us 40 ounces today! From a teeny tiny little udder! :shocked:

    I guess hubby knows how to pick them after all, since Rudy is HIS goat. :ROFL:

    I will try to get a picture of her itsy bitsy udder tomorrow.
     
  2. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    I agree....cup or quart contribution is important! :thumbup:

    Amazing isn't it? I bet she does even better her next time around....and good for you for taking rom that teeny udder!
     

  3. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    Did I mention she has TINY TINY little teats? :ROFL:

    Thank goodness I have small hands. :greengrin:
     
  4. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    Small hands are a blessing with tiny teats! My Angel has "pinky" teats and my massive hands are too big for her! I use my thumb and forefinger to milk. :slapfloor:
     
  5. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    Oddly enough a lot of people think size is what matters they think that bigger udder means more milk. A lot of times its exactly the oppisite of that. A lot of time a bigger udder has more meaty tissue. The ultimate test is when a doe is milked out. she shouldnt have a bunch of extra tissue there.
    beth
     
  6. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    You are so right there Beth! I can tell immediate difference with my does...Angel, who has the tiny teats, really has a good bit of "meatiness" to her udder, it really looks no different after milking, now with Binky and Bootsie, udders look like deflated balloons after milking, but regardless if you can get something out of a meaty udder, it's better than nothing. Angel has one kid on her thru the day as the other left yesterday and I managed to get just over a cup from one side and that was just with it being 9 hours from this mornings milking.

    Epona, to get 5 cups from a teeny udder is great, I can't imagine getting even 3 from Angel! Your hubby definately did pick out a wonderful girl!
     
  7. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    Re: Tiny udder = little milk?

    Ugh, I'm so embarrassed to show you guys! :oops:

    I keep seeing such BEAUTIFUL udders that you all post, and then I take pictures of Hope and Rudy's udders only to see how lopsided, small, and in Rudy's case (and Cowbell's actually) poorly attached!

    I'm only posting because I said I would (like four days ago) post Rudy's udder so you can see how small it is. I'm fairly certain now that Rudy is Cowbell's daughter from a previous year, (Two of Cowbell's kids from December looked just like Rudy does and Rudy will sometimes attempt to nurse), and Cowbell also has a very poorly attached udder, but big teats and lots of production. Looks like her daughter is following suit.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    do not be ashamed at all - thats a nice udder. There is a medial devision and high and wide rear attachment -- she should milk well for you for a good while
     
  9. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Epona! Theres no need to be ashamed whatsoever! I think she looks good and the medial is nice too....the lopsided udder just means that the kid was taking more from one and not the other. She'll even out enough next time around....and keep milking her, she's already proven that she's a producer!
     
  10. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    Thanks guys! And don't you worry, she'll be milked out every day, she is doing great, especially for such a little doe.

    Hope's udder is lopsided too, and one side has always been like that. She also has a meaty udder, and so does Cowbell (Heck, she STILL has an udder, never became small after drying off).

    Ah well, they work and put milk in the pail. :greengrin:
     
  11. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Thats what counts! :thumbup: Though it is nice to have udders high enough that the teats aren't IN the milkpail! And your doe is definately "up there"...no worries on that one.
     
  12. Sweet Gum Minis

    Sweet Gum Minis New Member

    Oct 6, 2007
    Easley, SC
    If you notice that a doe's kids are keeping her lopsided, then milk the fuller side as soon as you can. Often newborns get attached to one side and if you milk the fuller side then the kids learn there's another milk dispenser too and will take over. Your job will be done. This happens mostly with singles.

    You need 12 hours milk to get a good idea of your does udder and attachments. I've seen some fill in and think they look bad and when you leave their kids on them 2 weeks and then take them off overnight. That next morning is when you get to see the real thing. While kids are nursing on their moms you won't know what the udder really looks like. Yes you can tell attachments, teat placement sometimes and maybe some medial, but it still doesn't paint the good full picture for you. Some does take on a round appearance, some a triangle and some a cone. So filing them in helps to determine what you have.

    What you feed also can influence the amount of milk your does produce. If you feed a blan diet with little to no added calcium then you won't get a high production.