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These two does are being offered to me. They are between 3-4 years of age and priced around 400-600. What do you guys think? Worth the money?


 

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Are they registered? 100% Boer? If not, then no, I wouldn't buy them.

Around here, you rarely see Boers priced that high unless they are amazingly nice, it seems there are a lot of Boers around here, the market is a bit flooded. But if that is a good price for your area then maybe consider it. . . .
 

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For a registered fullblood with the pedigree they have I'd say thats a fair price, they look to be very full bodied and if bred to the right buck should produce some stocky kids, now another thing to consider would be wether they have kidded before and if there were any problems with the births or even their udders, which may not be that important in meat goats(thats why it's ok for Boers to have numerous teats) but the udder is what sustains the kids til they are weaned....the second doe looks to be a heavy girl, so be careful when you do breed if you get them...overweight does tend to have problems settling after breeding. Adding good genetics to your herd is a plus and most times you can get your moneys worth with the kids wether it be for showing purposes or meat. If you can, check with other breeders in your area and see what they have in their herds....the internet is great when it comes to checking out pedigrees ....then you'll know for sure wether or not you'll be getting a deal.
 

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I really like the first doe. She has a nice front end on her. And that price is reasonable for fullblood, especially when out of ennobled bucks. Some other things to be considered would be udder structure. This has been said but find out if they are 2 teated or 4 teated. If you're looking to show them make sure they don't have fish teats. If they will just be brood stock its not as much a concern since this trait isn't often passed on.

Have they been flushed? Some breeders sell their does after they have been flushed. This can cause fertility problems.

What are their pedigrees like?

Have they been shown before? If so, how did they place?
 

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I also have never heard of flushing affect the fertility of a goat...I guess I could be wrong, but never heard of that. I have a lot of friends that flush their mares and have never had fertility issues. I know goats are different from horses, but generally I would think flushing would have the same effect. :shrug: I've heard it's good for goats, not often of course, so not sure why you think it effects fertility??
 

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Flushing in goats is where you make the doe super ovulate or produce way more eggs than normal. Then she is bred. After the eggs have time to be fertilized, she is cut open and the eggs are removed. The fertile ones are placed in donor does. This allows a breeder to have more offspring from their best does than naturally possible. However the process of removing the eggs can leave scarring which affects fertility and if they are flushed quite a few times the loss of all those eggs can affect fertility as well.

I personally would not buy a doe that had been flushed because of the risk of her having problems conceiving later down the line. Other people are willing to take the risk and will still pay big money. At a sale I went to recently the top selling doe went for $9000 and she had already been flushed.
 

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well I flushed my doe and didnt remove her eggs. So that is why I was confused.

I think in the boer world it must be different because when I asked how to get my does to produce more kids I was told to flush them. Worked great --- ended up with quads and triplets :shocked:
 
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