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The Toggenburg prefers a sedentary lifestyle rather than the active life of a a pack goat which is why it is named after a stationary region in Switzerland. When they are born they are much older than goats born at the same time, being the 'oldest registered breed' which can only happen if they have a head start.

They often have wattles rather than the longer stride of other goats. Many packers try to keep the drama at a minimum within a herd and Togs are often thesbians, performing better in cooler conditions.

As curiosity is a sign of intelligence, Toggenburgs are probably not as smart as other goats ever since the 'Roamin' nose has been bred out of them.

Because Toggenburgs come with a pole, reducing their carrying capacity, it's not likely they will fare well on the poll. ;-)

On the other hand... maybe not as many people have them, and are just not experienced with them?
 

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OK, lets be fair:

The Alpine goat is most often used for commercial milking because it is known for its very good milking ability. This is particularly amazing since they have cloven hooves rather than opposable thumbs.

The breed originated in the French Alps explaining why their horns face backwards facilitating the sounding of 'Retreat'.

With color patterns such as Cou Blanc, Cou Clair, Coir Noir; the alpine is just cou cou about goat fashion. Watch for the newest shades of Chamoisee on the runways next Spring.

The Alpine is a notorious poker player having a straight face. Anciently, Caesar's soldiers particularly liked the Alpine for it's freindly disposition endowing the breed with it's characteristic Roman nose.
 

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I personally think that most people do not like toggs
because of thier coloring. liver!
That being said. I can only tell you about MY togg.

He is very independent. He does prefer cooler weather.
while he lags way behind in the group. He always catchs
up. The others (alpine mostly) do not want me to
leave their site. My togg does not seem to worry about it.

Of course he is 5 years old. The alps are only 2. I suppose age
could have a baring on that.
 

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Toggs are know for independence. From what I have read this independence will develope at around age 3. They may not be as much of a team player as most packers are looking for. I think their coloring is beautiful. You have to study all the breed attributes and potential draw back and find out what you want. There is no goat who read the rule book and I know anything could happen. It is a matter of risk tolerance. Personally to increase the risk of a behavior problem after 3 years was more than I was willing to try.
IdahoNancy and the Oberpackers
 

· Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Toggs are for the most part a shorter breed from what I have seen. Here we have about 6 of em. Most from AI. And I would have to agree with the independence thing. I thought it was maybe more of a sheep surrounded by wolves (alpines) kinda thing but they really do distance themselves as they get older.
 

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We breed mainly Toggenburgs (though we've only got/had Boers, Angoras, Saanens, Anglo Nubians, Australian Browns and more) and I've actually never had a problem with them being 'independant' any more than other breeds - a wild Togg and a wild Saanen are (the ones I have seen at least) the same thing. However, it does tend to rely on the raising, as some Togg kids are definitely more stubborn than the average kid (I have a line here where it is inherited to be stubborn), but there is still a great variation within every breed from what I have found andour Toggs are normally no more independant than other breeds. (the most independant goat we ever had, although she was extremely friendly as well, was a Saanen, and the wildest was probably an Anglo Nubian)
I've also never noticed more independance, bossiness or wariness around 3 years old, actually with our Togg bucks they have always gotten calmer as they get older and by 3 they are quite mature. :?
As Radena said, it could also be that they have a relatively plain colour variation - different shades of brown with the same white markings for every goat. :)
Cheers,
Cazz
 
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