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Winter mulch around shrubs; compost it into the manure pile along with the shavings. Raked dried leaves added this time of year and left over loose minerals add a little extra punch. Dump the left over water from the buckets into it daily and turn the pile with a pitch/manure fork a couple of times a week.

It will break down faster the more it is turned. When the pile gets to the point it is what you consider large enough, work it over to the other side. Turn the top with the newest to the bottom into the beginning of a cured pile. On the side that was just emptied, start a new pile and start composting it.

It makes the best manure compost to use in flower beds, vegetable gardens and such. I have a neighbor that grows free range chickens, turkeys and eggs for sale to the public. We trade poultry products for manure compost and she sells the compost per 10 lb amounts. My supply doesn't always keep up with the demand. People really like goat manure compost immensely.
 

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Goat Mentor
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay everyone thanks for all the advice.

Burning leaves and brush is looked down upon in my township, so I doubt hay would be very welcomed.

I will look into our local land dump for sure...

NigerianNewbie your advice for getting it to turn over more quickly is seriously helpful. We have a mulch pile, thats where our hay is currently, we also have 3 compost bins. However, the waste was never breaking down quick enough for this to work. But your suggestions may help.

Even once it is mulched and composted, we don't necessarily have too much space to want to spread it. So I would still need connections with people to get it sold. But then again, there isn't manure in it -- so not many people would really want it.
 

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But I’m sure you have unwanted manure so it wouldn’t be that hard to get it mixed up. If there are ranchers ask if you can dump it off in their field. If it’s not moldy their cattle can eat it, or it can mulch and do it’s thing if it is. Any moldy hay I end up with I just scatter it out in the field. It’s not selling but it is a way to get it gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
But I'm sure you have unwanted manure so it wouldn't be that hard to get it mixed up. If there are ranchers ask if you can dump it off in their field. If it's not moldy their cattle can eat it, or it can mulch and do it's thing if it is. Any moldy hay I end up with I just scatter it out in the field. It's not selling but it is a way to get it gone.
We don't have a field, lol.

The problem we had was that our poop WAS with our hay but the poop was composting and the hay wasn't. So now our manure and soiled bedding goes elsewhere.
 
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