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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We only have one Nubian doe in milk right now, who produces a gallon per day, but we cannot keep up with her production. I have made queso blanco cheese, fudgcicles, and *tried* to make yogurt. I also drink a lot of it every day and feed some to the dogs and chickens, but we are still drowning in milk. Yesterday I had to dump three gallons of spoiled milk. :( I didn't think it would go bad when it was only about 2 weeks old. I am going to make some yogurt today and I have tried to look for a good ice cream recipe yesterday, but it seems like they use more egg yolks than milk. I don't know what I am going to do next year, with two and maybe even three does in milk!! What are some simple recipes that use up a lot of milk?

Thanks!
 

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you can freeze it in zip lock baggies for dry months ...great for gardens, pigs, bottle calves,cheese,soap, lotions, pudding,..
 
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Goat Girl
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You can make soap. I just got 4 little pigs to feed the extra milk to. They are already weaned, but suck the milk up out of a pan like it is going out of style. You can raise up some nice feeder pigs on milk. Piglets don't cost much (unlike bottle calves) and you can raise them up on goat milk and pig feed, then keep one for your freezer and sell the extras.

If you do go with the pigs, just make sure you get a meat type and not a potbelly.
 

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You can send that extra milk to me! :D I'd try out the cheese recipes in 200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes by Debra Amrein-Boyes, that all start with a minimum of a gallon of milk! I haven't had the problem of too much milk, but I would do various things...I bet your freezer's full of milk already, so I won't suggest that. But here's an ice cream recipe that uses no eggs:
4 cups table cream (so, rich goat milk should suffice? worst case, consume as ice milk)
half cup sugar
one cinnamon stick, or one third vanilla pod, or 2 tbsp ground cinnamon, or 1-2 tbsp vanilla extract, depending on what you have, and like
Bring cream, sugar, and cinnamon stick or vanilla pod, if using that, to a simmer. Strain into a clean bowl (cinnamon becomes gelatinous) and add vanilla extract at this time, if you're using it.
Let cool, then refrigerate until completely cold. Remove pod/stick, and transfer to ice cream maker.
 

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make cheese (like chevre) and freeze it. Cheese takes up less room in the freezer than milk. You'll have dry months coming. Next year, if you think one goat gives enough milk, let one of your goats dry up. No one says you have to breed or milk them both.

As for ice cream, this is my favorite book - http://www.amazon.com/The-Perfect-Scoop-Accompaniments-ebook/dp/B005EH3ERU/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1 I make a lot of ice cream - Balsamic strawberry with Feta is one of my favorites and uses up a lot of that goat milk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for all the great ideas guys! I am going to make yogurt and vinegar cheese today, which should use up a big chunk. I should probably try out our new cream cheese cultures too. I am a bit nervous to try making "real" cheese, but I am sure I will get it right eventually! I just made everyone strawberry goat milk smoothies and we made pudding last night. That ice cream recipe is perfect, thank you Goat_in_Himmel. I have to make some banana bread today anyway, so I might try to incorperate extra milk somehow. I use the whey for our garden, so I guess I could use milk too. It looks like I will be spending the day in the kitchen. :)

We aren't allowed to have pigs in our area, otherwise I would definitely consider it! I haven't frozen any yet, just because there isn't any room in our freezer. If I can find some space, what should I freeze it in? I also need to learn how to make soap when I get a chance.

Yogurt question: Is there any way to make good yogurt without a yogurt maker?

@ AmyBoogie, I would dry them up to give them a break, but our last show (and the one I am required to be in for FFA) isn't until early October. Otherwise I would. :)

Keep the ideas coming! :D
 

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Goatless goat momma
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for yogurt, do you have a pilot light in your oven or a clean, non-smelly small cooler? i leave mine in the oven for warmth. i've tried the cooler method with mild success. make sure you put in hot water to heat up the cooler before the milk goes into it.

as for ice cream, here's a really easy vanilla ice cream
http://www.iloveicecream.net/recipes/ice-cream/goat-milk-ice-cream-recipe/

last thing - you can also look into doing kefir. kefir is similar to yogurt (runnier), but far less hassle to make.
 

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I could eat this every night. It uses some milk up...

Old-Fashioned Baked Custard Recipe

Yields: 6 servings
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:
4 to 6 eggs*
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
3 cups milk, heated until very hot
Ground nutmeg or ground cinnamon for garnish, optional
* The amount of eggs used can vary according to your needs. When I make the custard for dessert, I usually use 4 eggs. When making for breakfast, I increase the recipe to 6 eggs.

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Adjust oven rack to center position. Lightly butter (or use non-fat vegetable spray) six (6-ounce) custard cups and set them into a large baking dish. If cooking custards in a metal pan, cover the bottom of the pan with a layer of newspaper to ensure an even temperature on the bottom.
In a large bowl, beat eggs slightly; add sugar, vanilla extract, and salt and beat until dissolved. Mix in hot milk until blended. Pour egg mixture into prepared custard cups. Sprinkle with nutmeg or cinnamon.
Bring the water for the water bath to a light simmer on top of the stove; carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come half-way up the sides of the custard cups. NOTE: The most common mistake people make in baking a custard is not putting enough water in the hot-water bath. The water should come up to the level of the custard inside the cups. You must protect your custard from the heat. Carefully pour hot water into the baking pan to come halfway cup the sides of the custard cups.
Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until set around the edges but still loose in the center. The cooking time will depend largely on the size of the custard cup you are using, but begin checking at 20 minutes and check back regularly. When the center of the custard is just set, it will jiggle a little when shaken, that's when you can remove it from the oven. Remove from oven and immediately remove cups from water bath; cool on wire rack until room temperature. Cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 2 hours or up to 2 days.
Makes 6 servings (depending on size of custard cups).
 

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Ricotta cheese is super easy to make and it uses a gallon of milk. Just heat the milk to 180-185 degrees (stirring often) add half cup of either lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, stir until curds form, which should be instantly, drain the whey and curds through a cheese cloth, hang the cheese cloth with the curds in it for about half an hour, add non-iodized salt to taste and enjoy. You can also add any kind of herbs/seasonings you want for a different taste. Ricotta works great with crackers, in lasagna, manicotti's and more.
 

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Goathiker ,
I could LIVE on custard, pudding, pie, cake, brownies, ice cream, cobbler, yogurt, kefir, sherbet, whipped cream, just about any desert :)

Hehe, just go crazy making deserts that should use some milk :D
And send me some......:)
 

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Goat milk soap is great and you can use sour milk for it too. It is easy to make and takes little time once you have all you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You guys have the best ideas! I never could have thought of all these different options. The desserts sound heavenly :drool: , like I need more dessert. :p

I tried to make yogurt yesterday, following exact instructions. I thought for sure it wold work, but all I ended up with was watery, warm, funny-smelling milk. :( I heated it to 180F, and allowed it to cool to 115F before adding the starter culture, based on instructions that came with the cultures. I stirred it gently, and poured it into 2 mason jars. I placed it into a cooler and filled the cooler with water heated to 115F. I let it incubate without touching it for 8 hours, but no luck. What did I do wrong this time? :confused:

I really want to try making kefir, because it is so healthy and simple to make. I was going to order some grains, but one box was nearly $20 from cultures for health!
 

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did you hold the heat at 180 degrees for 10-20 min? I had a yogurt pack that told me to heat it up, but didn't tell me I had to hold it there for that long, so I had a runny mess the first time.

I got those kefir grains from Cultures for Health last year, and it took me a while for the grains to really thrive. but they're healthy and vigorous now.

on my online kefir travels, I came across this website http://www.kefirlady.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
did you hold the heat at 180 degrees for 10-20 min? I had a yogurt pack that told me to heat it up, but didn't tell me I had to hold it there for that long, so I had a runny mess the first time.

I got those kefir grains from Cultures for Health last year, and it took me a while for the grains to really thrive. but they're healthy and vigorous now.

on my online kefir travels, I came across this website http://www.kefirlady.com/
That must be it! I turned the burner off right when it hit 180, but it did take a while to cool down. They should really put that in the directions! Thanks for the tip and the kefir link! :)
 
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