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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So this buckling just turned 6 months old yesterday. He was chunky and a little shorter than the adult mini nubians he is a full size Nubian. It appears he is now a little taller than them. He seems to have sprouted up in height but looks a lot thinner. While standing i run fingers down and i can feel all the vertebrae but belly is not skinny. He only gets hay, pasture (which i never seeing him eat) and they have two mineral blocks one with selenium one regular and free choice minerals by mana pro and always fresh clean water sometimes a treat of whole corn but sparingly. He is not acting abnormal in any way. Just got thin looking. Maybe hormones? He recently discovered he is a boy and tries mounting the girls lol

Famacha is perfect and eats and drinks well.
 

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You could try adding in some goat pellets to his diet to see if he gains more weight. Sometimes hay and pasture alone if they are poor quality don't supply the protein growing goats need.
 

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He looks like he's a little hunched, with his rear tucked under. I know goats sometimes stand strangely when they're at the feeder, but if he stands like that often, he may have internal discomfort due to worms/coccidia. I've also had them look like that when they're zinc deficient. I have no idea what the correlation is there, but it's just something I look for now.
I like to offer feed pellets to the growing kids. Sometimes they really chow down on them, and sometimes they couldn't care less, if their forage and hay are supplying all they need. But I like to give them the option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. Famacha looks great so i rules out worms. What kind of pellets? I mean i thought no grain for bucks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You could try adding in some goat pellets to his diet to see if he gains more weight. Sometimes hay and pasture alone if they are poor quality don't supply the protein growing goats need.
what kind of pellets? I was under the impression nothing but hay, water and pasture for bucks.. I have textured all stock feed I give to the does mainly on milking stand only.
 

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I wouldn't give him all stock, (or any goats all stock really, unless it's just a treat). Bucks can have grain, it's about the calcium: phosphorus ratio. You'll just need to find a grain that is balanced for the diet he's getting. I like Blue seal products, if you can get them. I have used their Grow&Finish 16 for my bucklings. It has a cal : pho ratio of 2:1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wouldn't give him all stock, (or any goats all stock really, unless it's just a treat). Bucks can have grain, it's about the calcium: phosphorus ratio. You'll just need to find a grain that is balanced for the diet he's getting. I like Blue seal products, if you can get them. I have used their Grow&Finish 16 for my bucklings. It has a cal : pho ratio of 2:1.
This is the only one really available near me (there are some feed and grain stores but prices are outrageous):

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/dumor-goat-feed-50-lb-159177499-1

How much ammonium chloride per serving?
1answer


  1. ErlindaC
    · 4 months ago

    0.625% converts to 2.8 grams per lb. Ammonium Chloride is very bitter, if we tried to add more, the goats wouldn't eat the pellets.
Guaranteed Analysis:
Crude Protein (min.) 16.00% (This includes not more than 1.50% equivalent crude protein from non-protein nitrogen)
Crude Fat (min.) 2.00%
Crude Fiber (max.) 16.00%
Calcium (Ca) (min.) .75%
Calcium (Ca) (max.) 1.25%
Phosphorus (P) (min.) .35%
Salt (NaCl) (min.) .25%
Salt (NaCl) (max.) .75%
Copper (Cu) (min.) 22.00 ppm
Copper (Cu) (max.) 25.00 ppm
Selenium (Se) (min.) .30 ppm
Vitamin A (min.) 3000 IU/lb.

Ruminant meat and bone meal free..





  1. this is the all stock i have been buying it has what looks to be a better ratio than the one above:

  2. PRODUCER'S PRIDE®
    SWEET C.O.B.
    SUPPLEMENT FEED FOR CATTLE ON PASTURE,
    MAINTENANCE OF HORSES, GROWER
    SHEEP AND GOATS
    CAUTION: USE ONLY AS DIRECTED
    GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
    Crude Protein (Min)
    Crude Fat (Min)
    Crude Fiber (Max)
    Calcium (Ca) (Min)
    Calcium (Ca) (Max)
    Phosphorus (P) (Min)
    Sodium (Na) (Max)
    ....................................................8.00 %
    ...........................................................2.50 %
    .......................................................7.00 %
    ......................................................0.01 %
    .....................................................0.51 %
    .................................................0.20 %
    ......................................................0.51 %
    INGREDIENTS
    Barley, Flaked Corn, Whole Oats, Cane Molasses, Soybean Oil,
    Propionic Acid (a Preservative), Citric Acid, Phosphoric Acid.
    53F9-TRL-W 5
    DIRECTIONS
    Feed as a grain supplement to livestock with access to hay or
    pasture. Provide mineral supplementation appropriate to the
    species being fed.
    CAUTION
    Store in a dry, well-ventilated area protected from rodents
    and insects. Do not feed moldy or insect-infested feed to
    animals as it may cause illness, performance loss or death.
    Its all listed on the back of the bag.


    All vitamin & mineral content can be found on the tag attached to each bag & can vary depending on plant and manufacturing process. Basics found - Calcium max (1.4%), Phosphorus Min (.40%),Salt Max (.75%), Copper Max (35.00 ppm), Selenium (.30ppm), Zinc Min(80ppm), Vit A (2500iu/lb).
 

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He doesn't look bad at all weight-wise. Can you get alfalfa pellets? I know they are a bit more costly than all-stock but they are healthier than that. The tractor supply ones are 16% protein and will help pick up the weight on him. He doesn't need a huge amount.

Our bucks get alfalfa hay daily and grass hay 24/7. They have great weight on just that. I think the alfalfa hay is what boosts them. At times I have given them a small amount of grain. I do like to feed my kids a bit of grain the first year, they don't get a bunch and the majority of the diet is hay to build their rumens.

I would check his fecal for cocci though too. He seems to be growing well though. Our full Nubian buck at 7 months was taller than my mini-Nubians and maybe an inch or two shorter than my full Nubian does. Also if he recently grew in height or going through a spurt, they tend to thin out a bit.
 

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Yeah, I don't feed sweet feed. I give a 14% protein feed from my local feed mill to all my goats, and supplement with alfalfa pellets for the heavily bred and in milk does. My feed has a cal : phos ratio of 2:1, and I've not had any issues with UC so far. Even if your feed is balanced, you could have issues still if there's something in your hay, forage, or water that's throwing the ratios way off. But if you provide a variety of food options, I think they will self-regulate, at least to some extent.
I understand about the price. :) my feed is cheap, but the price is rising, like everything else.
Some goats seem to need more extras than others. A couple of mine really thrive on minimal feed, while others quickly get skinny. If you're feeding really good hay, or they have access to lots of good forage, feed may not be necessary. But I do like to offer it still, so I know they can get what they need. Sometimes, they will really go after it. Other times, I leave the goat pen with feed pans that are still mostly full.
 

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I'm not a fan of the "all-stock" type of feed either. I use a locally milled feed as well it's 15% protien. The TSC Dumor brand goat feed is ok. I understand about the allure of $8 per bag all stock, but you it's like anything else....pay less on the front end and you'll end up paying more on the back end. I understand the concern about calcium to phosphorus ratio and UC, but is he a wether or will he be left in tact? While bucks can get UC, it's much more common in wethers. Most commercially available goat pellets take this into consideration when making their feed. If you're a little uncertain or concerned about mixing your own feed, then get the Dumor goat pellets. Personally, I also avoid a general sheep and goat pellet as it doesn't contain the copper that goats need. As a side note, I know we've all been looking at the feed issue contributing to what you feel is an underweight goat, but could something else have caused him to fall behind the others? Does he get bullied by the others at feeding time? Did he suffer coccidiosis earlier in life? Any "bankrupt" (brown stomach) or tape worm? Though the barberpole worm is the main parasite we (well, myself anyway) worry about, the bankrupt worm and other parasites can cause a goat to look thin and lag in growth compared to others. However, these "lesser" worms do not generally cause anemia nor affect the FAMACHA like the barberpole as these "lesser" worms are not the blood suckers like the barberpole. Have a fecal done, just for peace of mind. If all comes out normal, then nutrition changes could help add weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not a fan of the "all-stock" type of feed either. I use a locally milled feed as well it's 15% protien. The TSC Dumor brand goat feed is ok. I understand about the allure of $8 per bag all stock, but you it's like anything else....pay less on the front end and you'll end up paying more on the back end. I understand the concern about calcium to phosphorus ratio and UC, but is he a wether or will he be left in tact? While bucks can get UC, it's much more common in wethers. Most commercially available goat pellets take this into consideration when making their feed. If you're a little uncertain or concerned about mixing your own feed, then get the Dumor goat pellets. Personally, I also avoid a general sheep and goat pellet as it doesn't contain the copper that goats need. As a side note, I know we've all been looking at the feed issue contributing to what you feel is an underweight goat, but could something else have caused him to fall behind the others? Does he get bullied by the others at feeding time? Did he suffer coccidiosis earlier in life? Any "bankrupt" (brown stomach) or tape worm? Though the barberpole worm is the main parasite we (well, myself anyway) worry about, the bankrupt worm and other parasites can cause a goat to look thin and lag in growth compared to others. However, these "lesser" worms do not generally cause anemia nor affect the FAMACHA like the barberpole as these "lesser" worms are not the blood suckers like the barberpole. Have a fecal done, just for peace of mind. If all comes out normal, then nutrition changes could help add weight.
Ok so i took the advice and bought blue s seal i found some nearby I've been mixing it 50% with the rest of the sweet feed i have and he gained weight right back two feedings per day about two lbs for three goats.
No he is not a wether he is and will remain intact.

A secondary question is when can i put the kids in with the adults currently i have that buck born in January in with two two yrs old does. Then in a separate area i have two doe kids born in April. Is there a danger of them being bred too early if i put them in there all together? They all get along i put them in supervised from time to time now.
 

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Ok so i took the advice and bought blue s seal i found some nearby I've been mixing it 50% with the rest of the sweet feed i have and he gained weight right back two feedings per day about two lbs for three goats.
No he is not a wether he is and will remain intact.

A secondary question is when can i put the kids in with the adults currently i have that buck born in January in with two two yrs old does. Then in a separate area i have two doe kids born in April. Is there a danger of them being bred too early if i put them in there all together? They all get along i put them in supervised from time to time now.
I'm glad he's gaining some weight! Good job!
I wouldn't keep any doe you don't want to breed in with a buck.
 

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Well i do want them bred to have kids in the spring i just dont want them bred too young for thier health. I dont know when is a safe time to put them in with the adults.
Everyone has different opinions on when to breed doelings for the first time. 8 months old and 80 lbs. is the rule some go by. I plan to breed my doelings their second fall, when they're roughly 18 months old. I followed the 8 months or 80 lbs. rule a couple years back, and did not like what pregnancy and kidding did to that doe's health. She was fine in the end, but I don't think I'll intentionally breed any does that young again.
I keep my buck (s) separate from the does at all times, and remove individual does to a separate breeding pen when I want them bred. When I just had a single buck, he had a wether as a companion, so he wasn't lonely.
 
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