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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There should be a rule, written in stone, which says anyone who is kidding a goat for the first time should have an easy first kidding.

On March 14th Fuzzy had 3 kids and not one of them was in the correct birthing position! The first kid had front legs back. I brought the legs forward and Fuzzy kidded him at 6:48 am. The second kid had both front legs back, the head tucked under its chest and the hind legs crossed. I got it out after much manipulation. It was stillborn at 10:32 am. I called the vet after delivering it. The vet arrived, examined Fuzzy and delivered the third kid, back legs first, at 11:57 am. We had anticipated another stillborn and were happy to see a healthy, active doeling. The vet examined stillborn buckling and said it had been dead for about 12 hours. The vet cleaned Fuzzy, gave her antibiotics, oxytocin, steroids and banamine. He left me with Banamine and an antibiotic injection to give her today.

That night at midnight I checked on Fuzzy and the kids and they were all doing fine. Eating and nursing. I went out the next morning and Fuzzy was down. Eyes fully dilated, hadn't drunk any water since midnight. I made her get up and she was wobbly. I called the vet. When he arrived he gave her calcium via IV and orally. Halfway through the IV injection Fuzzy came to life. It was like watching a miracle. She was up, eating and nursing in just a short amount of time.

Today Fuzzy and the kids are doing fine. I gave her the final antibiotic injection tonight. This afternoon I relaxed and enjoyed the kids antics and gave Fuzzy a good brushing (one of her favorite things).

I have found that all of the reading, watching videos and being able to see symptoms are fine and dandy but I didn’t have the hands on experience or where-with-all to put 2 and 2 together to know what I was seeing! What a huge education in a very short period of time!

I posted some videos on YouTube late today. Enjoy.

Fuzzy and her buckling right after she kidded.
[youtube:1jkiluog]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nFbjkrRB6M&feature[/youtube:1jkiluog]

Kids at play 1
[youtube:1jkiluog]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ugn7yhHY8U&feature[/youtube:1jkiluog]

Kids at play 2
[youtube:1jkiluog]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3dNTWaSQxQ&feature[/youtube:1jkiluog]

Kids at play 3
[youtube:1jkiluog]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFseQhZahi0&feature[/youtube:1jkiluog]
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Aw, your babies are precious! I'm sorry you had such a rough start to kidding and that you lost one, but I'm glad everything turned out ok for everyone else. At least from now on all the deliveries will seem easy, right? I really hope my first ones are without drama!
 

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Yeah those are some great looking goats. Wish I had em. I love the color. It seems like the one with the wavy stripe has curlier or longer hair.

I'm interested in the problem the next morning. How does a milk goat run out of calcium suddenly... is that what it was? I dont quite get the problem/symptom/cure path on this one. I certainly would have failed to think of calcium. Its awesome that the cure was so quick.

On a side note, humans bred goats and sheep to have a lot of offspring at once. I get the feeling that this goat would be dead without multiple interventions from attentive and ultimately specifically trained people around. I wonder if getting triplets is worth it if your breeding stock keeps failing to survive the birthing process. The only goat born here was a single from a saanan. I wasnt really expecting it and so wasnt there for it. Fortunately it went well (perhaps because it was a single). I guess only large operations would have the statistics to say which (triplets or single/doubles) would produce more surviving goats in the end (without human intervention).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got some good shots of the kids today and thought I'd share them. I still don't have a name for the buckling but the doeling is Gracie. He had a perfect white anchor on his forehead when he was born (it turned into a large white spot) so I have been trying to think of something to go with that marking.
 

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It is called eclampsia. It actually can be caused from having too much calcium
before the kids are born. Then once the kids are born and start nursing the body
says, hey wait a minute my calcium is being depleted. and I needed it.
They say to take your does off high calcium diet a month before they kid.
Then give the doe calcium after they are born and nursing.
Yes I know it sounds odd. but I learned this when I raised Yorkies.
It was based on the same principals. I have not had kids in over 30 yrs. Expecting my first
ones the end of June. I need to start collecting my birthing items here pretty soon.
 
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