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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every one has their tricks so save time, money, stress..

I would love to hear these :) They can be about anything, (the barn, fence, feed, vet, meds, ect)
 

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Don't wait until your goat is at death's door before calling the vet. If you can't figure it out or what your doing isn't working, get the vet out.
 

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Blackberry root tea, phenominal scour/diarrhea stopper.

Milk cartons and jugs, great chicken feeders and waterers

Tylan200, great for eye infections when squirt onto the eyeball itself

Feed bags make great garbage bags

Yogurt is a good probiotic

3 drops of liquid dish soap in 3 squirts of milk is a mastitis test


I have several more, I'll post as they come to me.
 

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If you use electric fence.>> Run a wire from your ground rod/rods to the actual fence itself. This way if the soil gets super dry causing you to lose your ground ... you will have a VERY STRONG "Back-Up". No more running/hauling water to your ground rods during droughts. I do this with every electric fence that ive installed and I have had ZERO ESCAPES!!
 

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Well stress, because Im going threw this right now lol, just cut your losses and send trouble makers down the road, especially jumpers, you will spend time and money putting a top fence up and they will just laugh at you and jump any ways lol. To save money, shop around. Try to go to the growers on hay, they usually sell large amounts but in the long run is soooo worth it. Another thing, I hear a lot about jeffers, but in the long run valley vet having free shipping I end up spending less, well at least with the stuff I buy. And the copper for bolusing, I dont buy the goat ready, I guess it would be ok if you have 1 or 2, but I buy the cattle ones for large cattle and break them down. 9 out of 10 times more will end up costing less in the long run, and if there is a sale on anything, I buy the heck out of it. TS really disliked me when their minerals were on sale lol
 

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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Love them :)

Would be interested to see a pic of chicken waters/feeders..

I have a few..

Hay and grain feeders together, after they eat grain the trough catches the little particles of hay that fall (especially when feeding alfalfa) the goats love it..

Brooms! Great to clean water tubs with :)

Just lost all of my brain power and can not remember them. will come back when I can :)
 

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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's what my husband thinks! I am $1,000 in since march.. not bad at all!. He just don't understand lol

Every one has to have one little trick lol :)
 

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14,760 Posts
Haha.. don't laugh.
Pallets. We build everything with them. They are free & a great way to recycle! I am planning to pick up a load in the morning so we can start on a much needed shelter in the young does pen.

A small pallet tied to the wall is a great organizer for rakes, brooms, shovels, etc.

Milk jugs with a section on the front cut out can make great mineral feeders especially in kidding stalls. I'd use something stronger like laundry detergent/fabric softener bottles if they get too destructive with the milk jug. You can figure out how to mount them, or just cut holes and use some twine to tie them to the wall <again pallet walls, so easy to tie things lol>.

Pallets with the right size spaces, cut down can make great hay feeders.
We put some OSB and make a tray in front of them that away if they drop any, it will fall on the tray so they eat it.

Prune trimmers <not the kind with rounded blade> can make great hoof trimmers for small herds, they are about $5-7 and will last a long time if you take care of them.

Always keep a couple of decent spray bottles on hand, you never know when you'll need them lol

LA200 is awesome stuff, it's inexpensive and can be used for a variety of problems.

Bottle babies... just weaning our first bottle baby. We used the whole milk recipe and she great wonderfully on it. Someone somewhere once told me to put a little probios in each bottle. In the beginning she'd get runny poo. Started using probios and never ever had a problem since then.
We use the goats prefer brand goat probios from TSC, it's about $10 for a large jar, powdered, lasts a long time. Once in a while I'll take some out, put it in my hand and the adult does will lick it right off, they love that stuff. Easy to use for the others too, we put some in their feed <especially when the kids show them, we use it the night before/morning of>.
Mixes super easy in bottle baby bottle too.
 

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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Keep all your baler twine!!!!
-tie buckets so they don't get tipped
-make a make-shift lead in a time of need
-fast fence fix (panels)
-one of my gates is tied with it
once again brain fart and can't think of all their uses but I love love love baler twine :)

GOODWILL
Watch out for collars, leashes, baby blankets, baby bottles--lamp/kid nipples will fit in the rings of most baby bottles (you can pick up bottles for .25 or .50) baby nipples work too, towels, feed bowels (stainless steal bowls, deep pots, pans are good for chicken feed), clothes to make sweaters out of, old dog sweaters, stuff for toys :)
--- Yes I love goodwill.. I just got like 10 collars and 3 feed pans the other day! I paid .50 cents for my feed pans verses $5 at TSC!



I always have wire, wire cutters, a knife, pruners, plyers, and a hammer extremely handy at the barn :)! Picked all of these up at yard sales.
 

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Baling twine is useless at my place - the little snots simply untie it. :rolleyes:
 

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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have never had one untie it, Although I knot mine then just cut and get a new piece..

It's all my dad uses for our gates at the "main barn" for our beef... Holds in our 2,000 pound beef steers :)

I made a set of driving reins for my horse one time out of baler twine.. braided three pieces together, then used three strands of that and braided it :)
 

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Goat Girl
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2,018 Posts
If you are in my region, baling wire is great to save. You can wire up any gate, fence, or anything that needs hooked together. I can't begin to tell you how much baling wire we have laying around...

Pallets are awesome, we just made a shed out of them. We also stack all of our hay, round or square on pallets to keep the bales off the ground. Especially with the round bales it prevents them from sitting on wet ground when it rains.

If you are going to feed round bales, make or buy a goat round bale feeder. Otherwise you will just have a ton of waste, goats laying in the hay, on the bale and if they can get in with it the bale can fall over and kill them.

For all of our larger water tanks, a little hydrated lime (the powdered lime) in the water keeps algae from forming and if it does the lime takes the algae with it when you clean it out. Lime is also great for putting down on the floor to dry out the barn floor and it can get rid of ammonia.
 

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A stomach tube kit for a kid is like 4 bucks and can save a life.
Sometimes if you don't need a whole bottle of something it is cheaper to go to a vet and get a couple syringes of a product than buying the entire bottle ,and sometimes it is not. So know your prices on things.
I try to support our locol co-op as much as possible, but I am not willing to spend more than a dollar or two more no a product that I can get cheaper on-line. Again check your prices and your brand options. For example Ivermectin(the name brand) is $35.00 for a 50ml bottle at Jeffers and normectin is $27.00 both would be fee shipping with a $60.00 order. Our co-op only carries ivermectin brand so I always order normectin on-line. Then compare the 250 ml size bottles, still free shipping, but for 5 times the amount normectin is only $60.00 and ivermectin is $103 for onlyl a 200ml bottle compared to normectin being $60 for a 250 ml bottle. Of course if you wouldn't use 250 ml in the next 3 to 4 years then you should get the smallest bottle. But that is a big price difference.

I just priced probiotics, and decided the 240 grams powder probios tub is $9.00 at Jeffers it is $12.00 at our feed store, then I priced the 5 lb tub, because we started using it more. it is $35.00 on Jeffers plus $10.00 shipping so $45.00, but a tub is 5 lbs and a 240 gram tub is 1/2 lb so 10 x $9 = $90is. Even though I could get free shipping with the 240 gram tub and have to pay additional shipping for the 5 lb tub it is still half the price. Of course with a probiotic you really need to use it with in a reasonable amount of time. We started using more of it so it pays for us.
Then I talked to FAsttrack and they can ship me a 5 lb tub of probiotics for $34.00 right from the factory, shipping it in the fall or spring when wether conditions. I was just working on that, that was not meant to be a FAsttrack sales pitch, I don't sell it. LOL.

Safegaurd can seem cheaper at $19.00 for a small bottle for goats, but you have to give like 3 to 4 x the dosage on the bottle for 3 days. making it in the long run way more expensive than synanthic which is $100 for a bottle.
A tube of ivermecitn horse wormer is way cheaper for a couple goats than getting a bottle of ivermectin. But horse wormer is more expensive per animal.

If you have any amount of livestock, order a 100 count box of needles and syringes on-line. Way way cheaper. Not like they will go bad.

Just discovered a generic powdered corid that is almost 50% cheaper thru Jeffers than name brand powdered corid.
 

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You can never have too many double end snaps. Brass not nickel plated which rusts.
Top that with a few eye bolts placed at different heights along fence inside & out.
When you have a goat needing attention you dont have to bring her out just put collar on & snap to eye bolt.
 

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Goat Girl
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2,018 Posts
Just thought of something else.. When you are buying feed pay attention to how many lbs of feed is in the bag. TSC, Orscheln's and Atwoods carry almost all of their feed in 40 lb bag anymore instead of 50. Some of the grains are still in 50 lb bags, but most of the pelleted feed is not. So if you are looking at prices at a co-op vs the chain feed store it might seem cheaper at the chain, but if it is only 40 lbs more than likely it is more expensive. If I am comparing I always figure how much it costs per lb to know which one is the better deal. For example my alfalfa pellets (from the co-op) come in a 50 lb bag for $10, so $10 divided by 50 lbs is 20 cents per lb. Standlee brand pellets are $11.99 for 40 lbs which comes out to about 29 cents per lb. At this point I have to decide if it is still cheaper to drive over an hour away to the co-op to get a ton of pellets, or just drive about 10 miles down the road for enough pellets for the week. I usually go to the co-op because not only are the pellets whole 9 cents cheaper per lb, but when I buy a ton, they take off 1%, or $4 off the total which makes it a tiny bit cheaper. lol
 

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Legacy Lane
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726 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Carry your calculator every where! -- this drives my husband crazy that I compare prices on everything!

feeders that can be filled outside of the pen!

A stick when you have to go into the pen to feed, especially in the buck pen. I have only hit a few, but the sight of it keeps them from attacking you and spilling the bucket of feed.
 

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Senior Member
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Feed your hay off the ground in good hay feeders, Hay is not free these days. Well it is not free for us. Wasted hay is wasted money and Straw is cheaper for bedding. And in my opinion straw is a better bedding anyway.
 
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