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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the Breakfast twins Oatmeal and Maple are almost a week old just shy by a few hours. For the first 24 to 36 hours they were given colostrum then we moved on to Land O Lakes Pronurse. They seem to prefer eating about every 6 to 8 hours a day. They are doing very well. Oatmeal is up around jumping launching etc. Maple has always been high energy since day one.

We have made makeshift coats for them and they spend 4-6 hours day in the baby bin as we call it. A fully enclosed area of the barn that can be closed off. The rest of the herd has fully accepted them and Ally (lgd) keeps close eye on them and will lay with them to help keep them warm.

Is there something else I should be adding to their diet? They are growing at consistent rate as the three that have mom. So I think we must be doing something right I just want to be sure we are doing all we can.

Thanks
 

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Replacer can be hard to digest..many have soy in them and several kids get sick on Replacer so we just have a "why risk it" mentality. Land o lakes is a pretty good brand and if you are careful to measure correctly, be sure it contains no soy and not over feed..some kids do well. I prefer whole cows milk because it is easier to digest and a natural byproduct..meaning not made in a lab lol and unless one over feeds baby we have not heard of deaths caused by feeding whole cows milk. We can not say the same with replacer. It can take up to 2 weeks for undigested milk to begin causing baby to be sick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Replacer can be hard to digest..many have soy in them and several kids get sick on Replacer so we just have a "why risk it" mentality. Land o lakes is a pretty good brand and if you are careful to measure correctly, be sure it contains no soy and not over feed..some kids do well. I prefer whole cows milk because it is easier to digest and a natural byproduct..meaning not made in a lab lol and unless one over feeds baby we have not heard of deaths caused by feeding whole cows milk. We can not say the same with replacer. It can take up to 2 weeks for undigested milk to begin causing baby to be sick.
Thank you looks like we will be heading out to Dollar General and stocking up. I have read that some say to add a table spoon of plain yogurt as well?
 

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I haven't used the yogurt, hopefully someone else will chime in here. I buy a local dairy's milk that is pasteurized but not homogenized -- you have to shake it up before pouring. People and goatlets seem to enjoy it. It is sold at local stores but not the big chains.
 

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Adding a pinch of baking soda in first bottle is good to help and a bit of yogurt in another bottle wont hurt.

Be sure to feed based on babies weight and always feel tummy after feeding. You want a flat firm tummy..not too poochy and not sunken in. We start with 10-12% body weight in oz per day and adjust from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I haven't used the yogurt, hopefully someone else will chime in here. I buy a local dairy's milk that is pasteurized but not homogenized -- you have to shake it up before pouring. People and goatlets seem to enjoy it. It is sold at local stores but not the big chains.
I just spoke with my diary farmer friend he let me know that there is a place locally where we can get fresh whole milk. Hot off the press so to speak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Adding a pinch of baking soda in first bottle is good to help and a bit of yogurt in another bottle wont hurt.

Be sure to feed based on babies weight and always feel tummy after feeding. You want a flat firm tummy..not too poochy and not sunken in. We start with 10-12% body weight in oz per day and adjust from there.
that is what we have flat firm stomach I think we must be doing something correct then. Lot of work but they like little joy factories, makes it all worth it.
 

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Fresh farm milk is great. Just make sure they have a clean herd...no Johnes disease and such.
 

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So the Breakfast twins Oatmeal and Maple are almost a week old just shy by a few hours. For the first 24 to 36 hours they were given colostrum then we moved on to Land O Lakes Pronurse. They seem to prefer eating about every 6 to 8 hours a day. They are doing very well. Oatmeal is up around jumping launching etc. Maple has always been high energy since day one.

We have made makeshift coats for them and they spend 4-6 hours day in the baby bin as we call it. A fully enclosed area of the barn that can be closed off. The rest of the herd has fully accepted them and Ally (lgd) keeps close eye on them and will lay with them to help keep them warm.

Is there something else I should be adding to their diet? They are growing at consistent rate as the three that have mom. So I think we must be doing something right I just want to be sure we are doing all we can.

Thanks
Take the coats off them.
 

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I'm gonna be the devil's advocate here; if they are healthy, growing, pooping normally, etc. and you are measuring correctly and carefully, don't change anything if you don't want to. If you decide to change milk types, either do slowly over the course of 5 or so days or, give a day of feeding consisting of electrolytes to re set their systems, then do the new milk.

I have bottle fed a lot of kids on Land-O-Lakes Does Match. Only one year did I have problems and that was due to incorrect mixing instructions when they went from a 5 gal. bucket to a bag. Something got messed up. I've never had problems since. If something is working for you, don't change it. Every goat and farm is different and what works for one may not for another.

That said, there are a lot of milk replacers out there that are not optimal. So, the whole milk route is better in those cases. But generally, you can tell, by poor growth, lack of energy and diarrhea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm gonna be the devil's advocate here; if they are healthy, growing, pooping normally, etc. and you are measuring correctly and carefully, don't change anything if you don't want to. If you decide to change milk types, either do slowly over the course of 5 or so days or, give a day of feeding consisting of electrolytes to re set their systems, then do the new milk.

I have bottle fed a lot of kids on Land-O-Lakes Does Match. Only one year did I have problems and that was due to incorrect mixing instructions when they went from a 5 gal. bucket to a bag. Something got messed up. I've never had problems since. If something is working for you, don't change it. Every goat and farm is different and what works for one may not for another.

That said, there are a lot of milk replacers out there that are not optimal. So, the whole milk route is better in those cases. But generally, you can tell, by poor growth, lack of energy and diarrhea.
I was concerned about the scours, so we switched to whole milk, improvement was almost immediately noticeable.

thank you
 

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I'm gonna be the devil's advocate here; if they are healthy, growing, pooping normally, etc. and you are measuring correctly and carefully, don't change anything if you don't want to. If you decide to change milk types, either do slowly over the course of 5 or so days or, give a day of feeding consisting of electrolytes to re set their systems, then do the new milk.

I have bottle fed a lot of kids on Land-O-Lakes Does Match. Only one year did I have problems and that was due to incorrect mixing instructions when they went from a 5 gal. bucket to a bag. Something got messed up. I've never had problems since. If something is working for you, don't change it. Every goat and farm is different and what works for one may not for another.

That said, there are a lot of milk replacers out there that are not optimal. So, the whole milk route is better in those cases. But generally, you can tell, by poor growth, lack of energy and diarrhea.
We have 3 babies one is almost 6 weeks old and 2 are almost 4 weeks old. When we got them a week ago we bought Sav A Kid milk replacer and have noticed diarrhea. Took them to the vet and at the time only one had diarrhea and the fecal was clean and all three babies checked out fine. Vet sent us home with abx because he also had a little bit of a snotty nose. Now at least one other has diarrhea and both of the other 2 have snotty noses. The vet gave abx for all 3. They all 3 seem to have round little tummies too. Would we be better off switching them to store bought whole milk? If we do, do we need to give them anything else? We're trying to offer them goat feed and alfalfa, but I'm not sure they are eating much yet. They just kind of nibble at it.
 

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My dam raised babies will start nibbling on hay and getting interested in other food sources around 1 - 2 weeks. They want to do everything they see mama do. So I would definitely start offering hay, and also water to the babies. Make sure the water is in a bucket they can't fall into or knock over and get themselves wet.
 

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We have 3 babies one is almost 6 weeks old and 2 are almost 4 weeks old. When we got them a week ago we bought Sav A Kid milk replacer and have noticed diarrhea. Took them to the vet and at the time only one had diarrhea and the fecal was clean and all three babies checked out fine. Vet sent us home with abx because he also had a little bit of a snotty nose. Now at least one other has diarrhea and both of the other 2 have snotty noses. The vet gave abx for all 3. They all 3 seem to have round little tummies too. Would we be better off switching them to store bought whole milk? If we do, do we need to give them anything else? We're trying to offer them goat feed and alfalfa, but I'm not sure they are eating much yet. They just kind of nibble at it.
@TeHwrd I haven't ever raised a bottle kid. Hoping someone can answer your question. It sounds to me that they are either being over-fed or aren't digesting the milk properly. Maybe both. Your 6 week old is almost old enough to not need milk anymore. Not saying you should just quit feeding him, but he should be able to eat hay by now. I have heard that bottle kids are sometimes slower to get started on solids, if they don't have an adult goat's example to follow. Again, can't give too much advice as I don't have much experience in this area. If you were to start your own thread, you may get more input.
 

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@TeHwrd I haven't ever raised a bottle kid. Hoping someone can answer your question. It sounds to me that they are either being over-fed or aren't digesting the milk properly. Your 6 week old is almost old enough to not need milk anymore. Not saying you should just quit feeding him, but he should be able to eat hay by now. I have heard that bottle kids are sometimes slower to get started on solids, if they don't have an adult goat's example to follow. Again, can't give too much advice as I don't have much experience in this area. If you were to start your own thread, you may get more input.
Thank you! I realize it might get lost here, so I did that. I appreciate your insights though! I was thinking the little guy born 12/11 ought to be doing more solid food eating than he is... These are Nigerian Dwarf babies and I was wondering if I was feeding too much...
 

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Thank you! I realize it might get lost here, so I did that. I appreciate your insights though! I was thinking the little guy born 12/11 ought to be doing more solid food eating than he is... These are Nigerian Dwarf babies and I was wondering if I was feeding too much...
Hope you get some answers. You can feed kids by weight and age. A certain amount of ounces per pound, at certain intervals according to their age. I imagine someone on here with bottle kid experience will help you figure it out.
 

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Weigh the kid, take those pounds x ounces and take 10% of that. (10 lbs x 16 oz. = 160 oz. 10% of that is 16 oz. ) So, he would get 4 oz. 4 times a day.

Now, that is only a suggestion- you want his tummy to be a little firm (not empty feeling) but not hard and not balloon out past his ribs. Most babies will eat a little more than that, but that formula is a base to start at for feeding. You need to adjust based on your goat. (clear as mud, right?)
 
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