update:Its packed full of wild blackberries

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by crocee, May 21, 2010.

  1. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    I think there is a huge Mimosa tree in the pasture I am borrowing. I looked at the edible plant list on FIASCO and didn't find it on either list. Has anyone let their goats eat the leaves/flowers/bark without having a problem? Cutting it down is not an option as the land does not belong to me, I am only borrowing it until he decides he needs it again. If he ever needs it he has promised to give me 6 months notice to remove my fencing and goats. Its a 155' Wide X 220' Long, thickly brush and weed covered lot and its free for me to use. I will get a couple pictures so you can see.

    Update: The tree is Sumac and its safe. Pics below.
     
  2. kubileya

    kubileya New Member

    32
    Apr 7, 2010
    Laurel, DE
    Re: Mimosa tree in new pasture, safe? AKA Silk Tree

    Well... the leaves & flowers are edible for humans, so I doubt it's very poisonous. It grows like crazy all around here and I've never heard about any problems with livestock.
     

  3. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    Re: Mimosa tree in new pasture, safe? AKA Silk Tree

    Just got back from the county extension office as I needed to make absolutely sure of what the tree/bush is. It IS NOT a Mimosa, its a Sumac and its on the safe list. This is a good thing as its HUGE.
     
  4. MiGoat

    MiGoat New Member

    304
    Apr 21, 2010
    West Michigan
    Re: Mimosa tree in new pasture, safe? update: its Sumac

    It won't be huge after while!
     
  5. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    Re: Mimosa tree in new pasture, safe? update: its Sumac

    Here are a few pics of the pasture I am fencing in, along with the HUGE Sumac.

    This is looking from the road to the end of the new pasture. You have to use your imagination for the distance of 220', but where you see the grass cut in the distance is the fence line.

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    This is the HUGE Sumac,
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    This is from the existing pasture across to the fence line on the other side of the 150' wide new pasture.

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    There is barbed wire there right now but that will be coming down, I will be installing woven wire instead. I figure 3 rolls should do the job.
     
  6. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    They'll love it out there!
     
  7. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    Anyone have a picture of mountain lauriel? I hear it likes to grow along creeks and we have one on our land and want to make sure we get rid of any we find.

    Gina
     
  8. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
  9. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    CRAAAAPPPPP! I think we have some at the lower end.

    Thanks for posting that Crocee. I wonder if I can trick my mother into digging it up..
    She is taking all the huge ferns by the spring to plant in her shade garden. :) "Hey mom. You want any of these before we burn it out? It's really pretty when it blooms..." hehehehe :greengrin:

    Gina
     
  10. 4kids

    4kids New Member

    844
    Jul 21, 2009
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    We have a ton of Laurel- be careful to pull, pull, pull! Mountain laurel likes acidic soil and a covering such as moss, leaf liter ect...
     
  11. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    So after we get them up, clear the area of all litter and moss? We are cutting down some trees to open up the area and allow more sun light to get in. Do you think that will help any?

    We have some large ferns growing at the other spring and a guy down the road says his goats eat it like crazy. I always heard they are toxic to goats. :ponder: Anyone here ever let them eat it?

    Gina
     
  12. zoomom

    zoomom New Member

    142
    Feb 26, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    I thought goats were smart enough to avoid the poisonous stuff. I keep hearing 'this is poisonous' or 'that is poisonous' and then someone else says 'my goats eat that all the time'

    What i recall reading was that they nibble here and there, and don't eat alot of any one thing, so even if it is bad for most livestock they can handle it

    not that i wouldnt' try to remove something i knew was bad - i keep them far far away from my cherry trees, but also i LIKE the cherries, and i know how much damage they can do to a tree or bush that they desire - wish they liked box elder, b/c i have a ton of that, and i HATE it
     
  13. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    We have what we call choke cherry here and I heard on one list it's toxic if fresh but ok if dry. On another list it was the opposite. :sigh: Some of this stuff just doesn't make sense...

    Gina
     
  14. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Re: update: its Sumac, pics up of new pasture/weed field.

    Any tree that bears fruit with pits...cherry, peach, plum have a concentration of cyanide in the leaves, eaten in moderation when fresh or totally dry isn't toxic...it's when the leaves are wilted that they can be deadly as the concentration of cyanide is extremely high at that point.
    Mountain Laurel, Azealas and Rhodedendron are in the same family.... First time I ever saw a goat vomit was after eating a Rhodi bush, I personally would not risk having any of these within access to my goats...there are too many risks involved with the "what if's".
     
  15. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    How about Honey Locust

    There are a few Honey Locust trees on this property as well. I read they are toxic to horses, how about goats? Those thorns are mighty intimidating to me as I have to try to fence through some of the branches. I am armed with long handled pruners and leather gloves in my arsenal and a few defensive tactics should the tree attempt to fight back. Also got a couple boxes of bandages should it get in a few licks.

    So far I have got 6 of the 9 corner holes dug. It takes me a while to dig each one as I have rotator cuff problems and its hot as Hades out there. I have plenty of water and electrolytes to keep me hydrated and energized. Even though it takes me a bit longer than the average person, its actually a good thing. I found a whole bunch of wild blackberry plants that are loaded with berries. About the time I get ready to let the goats into the new area I should have quite a few quarts of them in the freezer.
     
  16. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Re: update: its Sumac, New ?, Honey Locust.

    LOL! We had a wild crab apple? tree that I used to do battle with. On the up side, in the fall it looked so evil, it was great to put tombstones under for Halloween. I even made the Blair Witch stick figures and hung (carefully) from all the branches. :slapfloor:

    Gina
     
  17. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    Re: update: its Sumac, New ?, Honey Locust.

    I talked to the owner of the pasture/field I am fencing and he said I could use said armored tree as a fence corner post. This will make it much, much easier and much less damaging to my body.The goats can use the trunk of the tree to stand against to reach the tasty leaves instead of my fence.

    So far I have not found anything they can't have in this area. The owner said if I did I could remove it since he will be cutting everything down when and if he decides to use it. Its a win, win deal for both of us.
     
  18. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    This field is packed full of wild blackberry canes and they are getting rips. Picked some for the neighbor tonight since he bush hogged the perimeter for me so it would be easier to put up the fence. Its slowly coming together but the heat is taking a toll on me. I would like to get it finished before winter so the goats can take advantage of all the great browse. I will get new pictures tomorrow.
     
  19. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    What a chore you have ahead of you...take your time and allow for very frequent breaks :hug:
     
  20. Bellafire Farm

    Bellafire Farm New Member

    810
    Jan 5, 2010
    NW Oregon
    WOW, it's a beautiful piece of land!
    And look... what is that shiny stuff... oh sunshine...WOW... haven't seen real sunshine since like...August/September of LAST YEAR!!!
    Sorry to be so frustrated, but us Oregonians & West Coasteners are SWIMMING in never-ending rain! UGH!! Maybe I can package some up & send it to you for rehydration! :slapfloor: