Urgent advice needed for my buck's hooves

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by goatilicious, Mar 1, 2013.

Tags:
  1. goatilicious

    goatilicious New Member

    11
    Jul 21, 2012
    Hi Everyone!

    I really need some advice urgently. The other day we noticed that our buck was walking on his back heels. The front feet are completely ok, as are those of all the other goats we have.

    The problem only seems to be with his back hooves. We have been out and cut them again today but he is still not walking on them properly. They are cut to pretty much the right angle (the hoof is parallel to the hair at the top of the hoof), but the one started to bleed so we stopped. We thought maybe they were just too long so we cut them right back today until we could see pink but the way he is walking seems just as bad?

    Can anyone advise as we are getting really worried as to whether damage has been done internally which is now stopping him from walking correctly. He doesn't seem to be in any pain and is walking/running normally.

    I have added some pics so you can get a better idea of what I am talking about.

    Help! Any advice appreciated.
    Thank so much
     

    Attached Files:

  2. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    I have not seen this before but vit. deficiency comes to mind or something has weakened his back legs and he is compensating by walking this way??? but which one Im not sure...I will be watching this thread to see what others have to say...
     

  3. Straw_Hat_Kikos

    Straw_Hat_Kikos The Kiko Cowboy

    35
    Feb 27, 2013
    North Carolina
    It is a mineral deficiency. Ok, get some SOURCE Kelp from the horse area at SS, get some oatmeal, and get some molasses. Make the oatmeal up (one serving) and put just a VERY tiny amount of kelp into it as well as a little molasses and stir it up. Make balls a little bigger than a golf ball and feed it to him twice a day. This may help him but it may not and it will not hurt him at all unless you put to much Kelp in it. This is actually very good for him if it helps or not.

    I would also call your vet and explain and see what he/she says.
     
  4. lacylou1

    lacylou1 New Member

    26
    Feb 5, 2013
    Kentucky
    Many years ago I had a doe that began to having trouble walking, I don't remember exactly but it seems it was her back feet also. Anyway I took her to a vet and he said it was a selenium deficiency. He gave me a supplement to add to her food and she got better and was later resold as a milk goat. Hope this is helpful.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. goatilicious

    goatilicious New Member

    11
    Jul 21, 2012
    Thank you so much guys! I really appreciate all your help. I will get these vitamins sorted for him, and get him checked out by a vet and hopefully he will recover.

    So thankful that I can come here for advice!
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with what was said, good luck and keep us updated.
     
  7. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    That is looking like weak pasturns to me. Selenium deficiency for sure.

    How old is he? I see that a lot in older camelids.
     
  8. goatilicious

    goatilicious New Member

    11
    Jul 21, 2012
    He is only three years old. Do you think he needs selenium shots? Or something similar to give an immediate boost?

    Thanks!!
     
  9. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    you can get BoSe from your vet....ask him for proper amount for him..: )
     
  10. goatilicious

    goatilicious New Member

    11
    Jul 21, 2012
  11. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    to be honest I think it is more a case of incorrect trimming. looking at both the front and the backs he has too much hoof material. they shouldnt be so tall.

    I am one who does not subscribe to getting the hoof parallel with the hair line. I find when this is done they tend to rock back on their heels like this guy (although I have never seen it quite this bad). Especially the back foot needs a bit of angle to it.
     
  12. goatilicious

    goatilicious New Member

    11
    Jul 21, 2012
    Thanks Keren, we have given him a shot of selenium today and will give his hooves more of a trim. We did think they were too tall, but last time we cut there was blood so we had to stop.

    The other weird thing is though that for a buck he doesn't smell at all, and he lives with three other does but hasn't managed to get them pregnant for two years now. He seems to get fired up when he is in season but none have ever been pregnant which also seemed like it could be linked to selenium deficiency.
     
  13. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    Wow, we have a doe who walks on the back of her heels like that, but her back legs are straight if that makes sense. I questioned it a few weeks ago on here.
    I have her feet trimmed right, not too much hoof, and still she is like that. IMO she needs the heel in the back to be longer.

    Since we're on the topic, this doe had a Bo-Se shot before Christmas, she lost her babies prematurely a week after that, but we never gave her anymore Bo-Se, wondering if I should give her more? We are definitely in a selenium deficient area, not sure how much mineral she eats.
    Oh, she's also getting copper bolus today.