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Well my very lovable and gentle Amos came back positive for CAE when I sent blood to WADDL. :(
On the plus side he is CL and Johne's negative.

I knew it was wishful thinking that anyone near me would have a negative buck. My one goat is *fingers crossed* pregnant as she didn't come back in heat two days ago when the other doe on the same schedule did. I was really hoping to breed the other doe to Amos in 17 days when she came into heat. A bout of pneumonia caused her to miss her last heat cycle.

I know I am going to have to retest everyone in the herd now that he is positive. I feel terrible, I searched for five months and he is the best I found and he is still positive and could have infected my girls.

Unfortunately he is separated by a fence, but can still touch noses with the other goats, and he has bred the one doe. He has not bled on anything since being with me. My current situation does not allow me to separate with anything other than the fence line. I might be able to try and find two very large dog chain link fences if I cross my fingers and pray at the local Family Center (our version of Tractor Supply). I could also take the one down that is around the does and put it up around him. That means my girls cannot get locked up at night, but they might be less exposed.

Is the damage done? Is it worth keeping him for the next 17 days until the doe comes into heat or should I try and get someone to come out and butcher him immediately? There is so much controversy and no clear answers to the spread of this disease that I just feel sick. I figure there is no point doing the retest until after he is gone because he could possibly still contaminate them up until that point. Is retesting everyone immediately when he's gone and then again in 30 days and then in 6 months enough?

Please help. :wallbang::mecry:
 

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Is there any chance of a false positive with the CAE blood test? I know that can happen with the CL test.

I would call & talk to WADDL about whether they suggest a re-test. Looks like they do:
http://waddl.vetmed.wsu.edu/animal-disease-faq/cae

I'm not sure how likely it is to spread through breeding or interaction versus a does nursing kids. Where is it that you live that it is so hard to find a clean buck? Just curious!
 

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I have had cae animals early on in my goat raising. I NEVER had a buck give it to a door vice versa. I had animals together that were both positive and negative and eating and drinking from the same bowls and it never spread. What makes it spread is blood and milk. 80% of car is passed in the colostrum, 15% in sweet milk. Also a very high percentage through blood. Never use the same needle on different animals for instance. I studied this ling and hard after I found out I had cae does. There's a 20 year university study on cae in goats and it found that bodily secretions such as breeding nd saliva do NOT contaminate other animals but only blood and milk. Some people don't agree but in my experience this has been the case and I trust a 20 year study and my own experiences.
 

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Was the buck ever injured 3 to 4 months before the test? False positives do occur if the goat has received heavy antibiotics or has been injured soon before the blood was drawn.

I would wait a little bit and test again.
 

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Well, I've never had a + buck, just + does, and while I never had any catch it from breeding, I've had them catch it by being penned next to + goats at shows. They can seroconvert the disease, rare, but can happen.
 

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False positives are possible. Good idea to minimize contact, but don't get totally heartbroken until you retest. If you can't separate, maybe put the food/water/minerals on the far side of the pen.

It seems like CAE is like HIV. Lots of panic about it, but it shouldn't spread easier than HIV does, except that goats have less-casual "casual" contact than humans and more fighting and food sharing. Your does are probably fine. I would still test them 1.5 months before delivery if possible, and every 6 months for a while, but don't be heartbroken about them yet.

If you use him again, it's strictly hand-breeding. No licking or fighting, just hump and dump. Low odds of transmission supposedly, but it would be a risk.

Could you test your next buck before you buy him? Or are breeders in your area totally unwilling to even let you test?

:hug: I'm sorry. Good luck!
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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The farm I worked on, all the bucks were CAE positive. We kept them separate by a walk way. Which is the minimum Id suggest. But we used the bucks for years with no CAE transfer. CAE doesnt do well outside of the body. Not like CL that can live on surfaces for a long time.

Now with this said, is there a chance for transmission? Sure. Thats the risk you run when keeping a positive animal. But its not likely. If it were me, Id of tested before he was allowed on to the property. But with that not an option. Id had breed the does to him and then sell him. And then test 2 times a year for the next 3 years to make sure. Good luck
 

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I have had cae animals early on in my goat raising. I NEVER had a buck give it to a door vice versa. I had animals together that were both positive and negative and eating and drinking from the same bowls and it never spread. What makes it spread is blood and milk. 80% of car is passed in the colostrum, 15% in sweet milk. Also a very high percentage through blood. Never use the same needle on different animals for instance. I studied this ling and hard after I found out I had cae does. There's a 20 year university study on cae in goats and it found that bodily secretions such as breeding nd saliva do NOT contaminate other animals but only blood and milk. Some people don't agree but in my experience this has been the case and I trust a 20 year study and my own experiences.
This has been my experience. Don't go out and hand milk and then let the does lick your hands. Try to avoid having scurs where does can break them off and ingest each others blood. I would only be slightly concerned about a positive buck as long as you aren't penning the does with him to breed.
 

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The farm I worked on, all the bucks were CAE positive. We kept them separate by a walk way. Which is the minimum Id suggest. But we used the bucks for years with no CAE transfer. CAE doesnt do well outside of the body. Not like CL that can live on surfaces for a long time.

Now with this said, is there a chance for transmission? Sure. Thats the risk you run when keeping a positive animal. But its not likely. If it were me, Id of tested before he was allowed on to the property. But with that not an option. Id had breed the does to him and then sell him. And then test 2 times a year for the next 3 years to make sure. Good luck
Good advice TDG
 

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also known as Mayia real life Cheri
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The usual transmission is doe to kid thru the colostrum. - its not immediate death sentence. Infected goats can live for many years. There are false positives, retest before making decisions. There are people who run positive herds, they might buy your buck from you.
 

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merryoaks
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I have a positive buck. I actually bought him knowing he was CAE+ It does not transfer through semen.
 

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First things first ...:hug::hug::hug::hug::hug::hug::hug: Now , do a lot of reading , take what advice makes sense to you , then move ahead with what you decide to do. Like was mentioned by a few posters , its not a death sentence by any means , so cheer up sweetie. Also , retest again , its worth the money IMO. You are not doomed and your herd isn't either. It will work out :hug:
 
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