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LDS homeschool mom of 6
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My neighbor's boer goat herd shares a fence with my goats, and one of their does looks very sick. She is skinnier than a dairy goat, especially noticeable compared to her meaty herd mates. Also her tail, rear, and inner back legs are a muddy poopy mess even though it is very dry weather. She is still in with the herd. Partly for neighborliness, partly curiosity, and partly wondering about contagion as they are so close to mine, what are some possibilities of what might be wrong with her? tia
 

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Worms, obviously.. I got a doe like that once, she was the only dummy eating a poisonous plant... It could be age, a wound, infection... Missing teeth... I hope it's not contagious
 

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LDS homeschool mom of 6
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Their herd is new and young, all under 2 years. She was eating and came to the fence trying to get me to feed her. I didn't want to touch her. What screams worms? The feces on the backside?
 

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awe poor girl...worms are most likely..could be johnes disease..cocci, and all the above lovemykidds stated...too many things..maybe talk to your neighbor..let themknow you noticed their doe was ill and if there is anything you might help with..??
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Worms because it makes it hard for a goat to put on weight (skinny) and eventually can make em get the runs as the parasite load becomes beyond a manageable level for the goat. Cocci is another good guess. But by the time they are at this point, there is blood in the poop and its near death. So worms is still a first choice. Johnes is another good idea. Johnes is a ruminant disease that effects the linking of the intestines that makes it more and more difficult for the animal to get any nutrients from anything they eat. So they slowly lose weight even thou they are eating pretty much non stop. Personally I would be over at the neighbors asking them to have the goat tested. Of the ideas mentioned, all but one can be dealt with pretty easy if not costly. Johnes on the other hand has no cure and is considered a herd killer. Once you have it you have it and its near impossible to get it outta the ground once its in. 80% of all US commercial cow dairies are infected by it. So never buy auction dairy calves and bring them to your property unless you are willing to accept the risks. Also a good idea not to buy hay from growers who run auction dairy calves on off season hay fields.
 

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LDS homeschool mom of 6
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73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I finally got up the courage to butt in (sadly now one of hers has CL too do she called to ask about it; seemed a Little upset at me). She said they must have missed her when worming because they wormed her and she is coming back nicely. I asked if i coukd give her a copper bolus through the fence to see if that helped. All is well in neighbor land. They say goid fences make good neighbors but i guess only if you dont have the same livestock on both sides!
 

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Its great your trying to help them..hopefully it not only builds a better neighbor relationship but she might be open to learn more about goat care...
 

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the problem is when people think a goat is just a goat...they don't take time to learn about them and care for them properly, even if she's owned them for 40 years..this is the reason that research money is not spent on goats..they are not looked at with the same eyes most of us look at them...They are expendable livestock...Is sad...Hopefully she will begin to see then as you do..as you point things out and try to help..maybe she will take a second look at what she has ;)
 
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