Watering System

Discussion in 'Meat Market' started by sabine, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. sabine

    sabine New Member

    21
    Jul 2, 2009
    I was just wonderiing what everyone had for watering systems. right now I haul water to the goats. Nice in summer but not going to be in winter. I need some ideas? Do we dig wells? Those cow waterers are so pricey. We want to maybe double up with pens that are side by side? Ideas would be so appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Sorry, right now I still carry water, and will likely always do so as I have a small herd. 5 gallons twice a day split between bucks and does is all they use :wink:
     

  3. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    We use those rubber water tubs. Then theres about 150' of hose. If its really cold & we forget to turn the water off I have to haul buckets from the bathtub.
    But if you have the bucks to dig a well GO FOR IT!!! Or the very least a water line from your house.
    Some folks use those heated water buckets.
     
  4. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    the hose that we have doesnt reach the pens, but, last year we ran a water line from the faucet on the side of our house out the goat pens...easy, cheap and works great
     
  5. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    We used to use about 500 feet of hose until we ran 1/2 inch pvc water line, about 1100 feet to strategic areas throughout the pens with double faucets on each riser placed in areas out of the way and where the goats can't use them for scratching posts. Of course we are talking about 4 acres of pens, I guess you could call them paddocks. We have 4 risers on one side and 4 on the lower side of the pens. We also have underground shut offs for each riser. Since we may only get 5-10 hard freezes in a winter, and no snow, well, occasionally a beautiful coating on the ground that usually melts by lunchtime, we don't have to worry too much about cracked pipes, just go out and turn off the water and open the faucet. I couldn't even visualize what it may be like in Alaska! :) Or even somewhere where it snows a lot! :shrug: Of course many cannot visualize having close to 100 nanny goats, billies, and kids! :scratch:
     
  6. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Katrina, do you have heated buckets for the winter? Does your line freeze up? If not, how do you keep it open ??
     
  7. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    I dont use heated buckets, just because it costs so much, and I dont pay the bills. :wink:

    the water line to the goathouse gets shut off in September when things start freezing. I start hauling water. the oustide faucet on the outside of the house doesnt freeze if you keep everything shut tightly. so I haul 5 gallon buckets for all the animals..which takes awhile.

    I fill buckets twice a day. I have a ft long iron bar to knock out the frozen water every other day. works easily with one good whack. but it freezes to your hands which hurts! lol I need gloves.
     
  8. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Get youself some gloves Katrina hon, I cant imagine life way up North . Yes even her near Seattle if its fuhreezing gloves and lots a socks.
     
  9. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    yeah we took a trip to and went through seattle, and I was surprized how much snow they had. it all melted by the time we had got to OR though.
     
  10. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    Sabine, Renting a trenching machine doesn't cost that much and pvc pipe isn't that expensive. Depending on how far you have to go, it may only take a day! You will have to buy galvanized pipes, fittings, and brass faucets to use as and on the risers, but you can buy a simple shut off for the underground part. Just find somewhere to tap into the house water, hook it up and go out from there. Check with your water supply company to see how deep the ground will frost in a really cold snap or if you live where it snows. Here in Texas we only have to go about 12 inches deep. Depending on where you live, you may have to trench deeper. I can't imagine how deep Katrina has to bury a water line!
    Anyhow, you can look at this as another capital improvement for your ranch. The more improvements, the more attractive to the buyer if you should decide to sell. And it sure beats hauling water for the goats. All you would have to do is get a hose, tub, and a $10 automatic waterer from Little Giant. :leap:
     
  11. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    the water at our farm is quite a ways from the dairy barn, so all year long we haul water back and forth, but we have a Kubota so it isn't that bad :) In the winter, we heat water up and mix hot and cold water to keep if from freezing.
     
  12. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    is a kubota like a six -wheel ATV?
     
  13. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    Its like a John Deere Gator, but a lot tougher built, and its diesel and 4WD so it works really good in the snow. :)
     
  14. sabine

    sabine New Member

    21
    Jul 2, 2009
    Thanks everyone you are all so helpful
     
  15. Just remember if you are registered as a farm, you can write your upgrade off in taxes so that will help. I have seen several folks, which I would like to do in time, put in those lines where the pip comes up and it looks like a water pump up top but it is the valve. I love those things and you can have them come up right by your water bucket.