Weaning, and/or seperating does from kids

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by thines, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. thines

    thines New Member

    23
    Jun 7, 2013
    Ok, so both of our does are about done nursing the kids, each doe only allows about 3 nursing sessions a day... One of our does is quite a bully, even to her own twins. One of them she even head butted so hard the other day, she flipped her in the air. She is quite the bully to our other doe too. I've posted about the other doe before, and she needs extra care as she seems like she was neglected at her previous "home". We have set up another pen on the property to put the bully doe, but wondering what the best way to separate them is. We moved the bully doe down there this afternoon, but they have been hollering all day. What is the best way to do it? Should I bring her up for the night to be with the kids?
     
  2. Used2bmimi

    Used2bmimi New Member

    Oct 2, 2012
    Western Colorado
    I don't think I would bring her back. I like to wean across a good fence so that they can see and hear each other but can't nurse. Others have different ways. Your bully doe will not like being alone, especially if she is too far away. But, to dry her up fastest and wean fastest,I would have them go cold turkey and all at once.
     

  3. thines

    thines New Member

    23
    Jun 7, 2013
    Unfortunately, putting her within eyesight isn't an option due to where the original pen is. We just don't have the room for another pen there right now. She is also a fence-pusher and has brought down a few, so I think if she could see the twins, things would be much harder for me. I'm assuming that the hollering will eventually calm down. We are hoping that she will calm down after being moved and away from the kids, otherwise, we will either have to get rid of her or consider putting her down. I can't stand the thought of having an aggressive goat that could hurt me or my children. She wasn't so mean when we got her, but the less the twins nurse, the worse she gets.
     
  4. Used2bmimi

    Used2bmimi New Member

    Oct 2, 2012
    Western Colorado
    Huh, that is strange. I wonder what is causing the change. Best of luck. Maybe she will settle after weaning.
     
  5. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    I would just go cold turkey. Not sure why the change.
     
  6. AdamsAcres

    AdamsAcres HaileyBailey

    382
    Dec 3, 2012
    I agree. Cold turkey and she should stop hollering in a couple of days. I don't understand the change of behavior either.
     
  7. rkendrick

    rkendrick New Member

    10
    May 30, 2013
    This is a thought about the aggression: hormones. Now that is not nursing her hormones are fluctuating. Not have her kids is stressful. Being all alone is stressful. Stress plus wild hormones equals wild unpredictable behavior. Will she settle down as her hormones level? I don't know. She should but sometimes...I hope you don't have to put her down but I would not let a goat live with me that was dangerous. I gave some level-out herbs to a manic mare once after weaning her foal. It helps until she leveled. Don't know how the two species compare, but it's worth a thought.
     
  8. thines

    thines New Member

    23
    Jun 7, 2013
    Thank you everyone for the input so far. I'm not sure if she was like this before she was bred or not, as she is one of the goats that we "rescued". She's finally slowed down on the hollering. I will be going down there in a bit when we have a break in weather and see how she behaves. I would hate to put her down, but we don't need aggressive animals here.