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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased an underweight alpine doe. I've wormed her, she has access to browse, free choice minerals, baking soda, and is fed 14% feed twice a day, aprox 1.5 lbs each time. Here is my question, as I am new to goats and don't know much yet: she seems to be getting a much larger belly, but isn't putting the weight on her top line and hips. Her bones still stick out quite a bit. I know a thinner dairy goat is healthier than a fat one. Is the large belly something to be worried about? How do I get the weight on in the right places? Thanks for any and all input!
 

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Large belly is either bloat, or a nice healthy rumen.
 

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It takes a long time for them to put on weight. Have you done a follow up fecal to be sure all the parasites are gone? Make sure to have coccidia included if you do a fecal.
 

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When you wormed her, what did you use and what dose?
I see that you are new to goats and even those who aren't tend to under dose a med as well as use one that doesn't work for certain types of worms.

As Karen said, having a vet run a fecal would be best, most cat and dog vets will do one as most vets can tell difference in types of worm eggs as well as coccidia.
As far as a belly but no meat on her bones, if she's filling up on browse and hay it will show in her rumen which is good as long as she is still getting the nutrition needed from the concentrated feed.
Alfalfa pellets, a good dairy ration with a 16-18% protein and adding a bit of dry beet pulp shreds with twice a day feedings should help with building muscle mass :)

For my Nigerian does in milk they get a combination of the above at a rate of 2cups 18% 1 cup alfalfa pellets and 1/2 cup beet pulp shreds twice a day, so far each has kept their condition while producing. Your doe being a standard may need to have the amounts adjusted.... I do use a dry measuring cup for feed as it's easier for me than going by weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wormed her with Ivermectin horse wormer, enough for a 250 lb horse, per what the tube said and recomendation from the woman I bought we from.
I think I'm just not used to the conformation of goats- we have been "horse" people our whole lives. She sure does seem to feel and act healthy, the large ruminant belly doesn't look unhealthy, just strange to me. :)
As for the grain, I think I'll switch her to a 16% now, then see if she needs the 18% when she comes in milk.
Thanks everyone for all the great advise. Ill do a fecal soon if she doesn't start putting a little more meat on.
 

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My doe that I had in milk for 2 years straight didn't look like bones. Even though her hip area was more "boney", there was still meat on her bones. She didn't look all bones at the topline and through the hips. Most dairy goats I see also aren't all bones. Yes, they are thinner but not bones.

You really should have a fecal done. This has been one heck of a year for parasites and in order to clear them up and have a healthy goat, you need to do that fecal and find out what worms she has. She could have coccidia and the Ivermectin Horse wormer will do absolutely nothing for that.
 
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