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I've asked this before in a different way, but I'm looking for guidelines for projecting a prospects mature weight and height based on current weight and height at various ages. My boys are about a year old. How much more will they grow? They say these guys continue to grow/bulk up for 3 years. At what age do they typically stop their shoulder height growth? Mine are right at 30" now and will be one year on march 15th.

Would be cool to have a table for everyone to go by. Maybe each 6 months till full grown.
 

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The problem with a table is there are a lot of variables that play into a goat's growth. Genetics and environment both contribute to the final results. Unless these variables are similar the table will not be of significant value. 4 years of growth is not unusal.
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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Id say the bulk of their growth is the first year but the first 2 are pretty close. Right now last years kids (9-11 months old) are still penned separate from the adults. The size difference between the two is pretty noticeable. Its in Sept. we totally separate the current years kids from their moms and that in turn pushes out last years kids from the kid pens. This makes them 1 1/2 years to 1 3/4 years old roughly. At this time the near two year olds are still not as quite as big as the adults but they are close enough to compete for rank and feeder space. Each year there will be a few kids that are actually bigger then some of the dams and some again that will always be on the smaller side. Genetics is the factor here.

As for a typical growth chart... the only way I can see to make one is for everyone to add their input on it and that in turn over say 100 kids, we would get an idea and be able to at least have an average.

Ill measure and weight tape the 4 boys I have here. They are between 10 and 11 months old. I did Legion 2 weeks ago outta curiosity and he stood just 31 1/2 inches at the shoulder. (He is in that growth stage where the butt has out grown his front and it needs to catch up :) And he weight taped in at 145 lbs. But I think he may have a few extra pounds of winter fat on him. Will post the rest of the boys later today.
 

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My older Saanen was 3 and around 185-190 pounds when I bought him and 35 or 36 inches at the shoulder. He's 5 now and 37 inches at the shoulder and around 215 pounds if the tape is right (goes over so I can't tell). My two year old is 185-190 pounds according to the tape but he's maybe 3-4 inches shorter. Curious how much more he'll grow but kind of all seems like a crap-shoot to me. I don't know how accurate those weight tapes are, I really want to get them on the scales :)
 

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Here is an actual sheet with various goats measurements and their actual weights that I did at the 2011 Rendezvous. It might give you an idea of your goats actual weight based on similar measurements. We have raised a bunch of kids over the years and we were pretty close when we doubled their weight at one year. That is assumming they are kept on the same proper diet through out the entire growth period. They will continue to grow until 4yrs or so.
 

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Thanks Rex, that chart has some interesting data. Our oldest goat is six years old and is noticeably larger/heavier (37" and 220 lbs) than our other three that just turned 2 years old in February. We have been wondering just how big they'll be when fully mature.

But what's most interesting (and confusing) is that one of the 2 year olds is already nearly as big as our mature goat. I suspect he's going to be a BIG goat by the time he's 4 years old! Curiously, his twin brother is probably two inches shorter and noticeably thinner/lighter....

Ken
 
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