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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hopefully this is the right place.

Anyways, I have a 10 year old Nigerian Dwarf doe who is in excellent condition for her age. She produces a lot of milk. I milk one side out, then go to the other. By the time I am done milking the second side, the first side is full again. LOL

Anyways, she's kidded twice at my house, both time giving me twin bucklings! She's such a nice doe, so I would really like to get a doe or two from her. What age should I retire her at? 11? 12? 13? She's my favorite doe, so I don't want to push her too hard.
 

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7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether
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Let her tell you when. When it seems like raising the kids is a bit much for them ... when they don't get around like they used to, or when they had a delivery that made me think "Hmm, she may be getting more tired than she should be", that is when I feel they are telling me, "Mom, time for retirement!" For some does that's 7, for others it's 14! All depends on the doe. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay. This year it took her about 45 mins-60 mins between the time she started having amber goo and when she delivered her twins. I helped pull, just because it was at 1 AM and I was tired and wanted them OUT! LOL. She's great at raising kids, gets around like she's 5-6 (that's what we thought before we got her papers) so so far, she is doing good. Hopefully I can get a doeling out of her! Then, sadly, I will retire her and sell her to a pet home. I'll miss her, but, I don't want to breed her to the ground.
 

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I agree with Danielle. When they are having true problems with kidding. When they can't keep weight on. When they just generally aren't as thrifty anymore. You will be able to tell when it is time to stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
She IS a bit thin, but she is a heavy producer, and a dairy goat after all. You can't see ribs, but you can feel them fairly easily.
 

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I don't go by age, I go by their ability to stay in condition with normal feeding. If they cannot maintain body condition without a ton of grain, they cannot support nursing kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Right now she is getting 2 cups (once a day) of 8% sweet feed (going to switch to 16% Purina Noble Goat for Dairy Goats) and about 2.5-3 cups (twice a day) of soaked beet pulp. She currently has one 3 month old wether still nursing (was nursing twins) and I am milking some once a day. Haven't milked her completly out because she is not a fan of being milked, and doesn't stand still for me yet. So not sure how much she produces but it's quite a lot. Judging by her udder before she kidded.
 
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