What am I doing wrong?

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by klingshirnm, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. klingshirnm

    klingshirnm New Member

    53
    Mar 3, 2011
    I need some advise about mastitis. Almost every goat we have or have had has gotten mastitis. This year no different. Our doe started showing little clumps in her milk, almost too small to see. Called our normal goat vet she said it happens when they start milking heavy (she is producing between 11 and 12 pounds a day first freshening 40 days in). So, called our emergency vet they said same thing. I didn't believe them but, 2 vets saying the same thing, well ok. Well yesterday found a speck of blood, now I truly believe mastitis, so we sent out some milk to be cultured. But, my question is why every goat does this to us? We keep pens clean, cleaning at least every 2 weeks, but make sure there isn't any exposed "dirty" areas in between. Have been cleaning udders before milking, making sure nothing dirty comes in contact with the udder, and use fight bac after every milking. Hay and grain are free from mold. But, for some reason we get mastitis. Is it possible to be hereditary? This does mom got mastitis, but she produced between 15 and 18 pounds of milk a day regularly, and developed a pendulous udder and thought it was from possible injury to her udder. But still other does without pendulous udders got mastitis too. Also wondered if it is possible if mastitis could stay in a barn? The barn our goats are in waqs an old cow dairy, but wasn't used for at least 12 years before our first milking goat came. I'm about at my wits end, we can't seem to keep a clean doe. Any advise or possible things I'm doing wrong? Please help.
     
  2. lissablack

    lissablack New Member

    Nov 30, 2009
    I hope you can figure this out. I suspect heavy milkers are more susceptible in general to mastitis. I haven't ever had mastitis in my herd, and I don't have any really heavy milkers. I prefer the richer milk that you get from less heavy milkers.

    I wonder if there could be a hereditary tendency to have it? Maybe someone else here will know that.

    Do you milk them twice a day? Maybe milking them more often would help. But at least twice.

    If there is something lurking in your barn, maybe soaking everything down with Clorox would help. My vet said a clorox solution 1 part clorox to 20 ounces of water will kill just about any bacteria. Maybe you have already done that.

    I wish I had some good ideas for you.

    Jan
     

  3. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    At heavy production, I too have had a doe with small clumps/strings in her milk, I use Dr Naylors mastitis test cards at least once a week and she never came up positive for mastitis... I notice this the first 3 weeks after freshening and again when the kids are weaned, she's kept clean before and after milking. Once I get into the routine of milking 2x a day, the milk clears up....she has never had mastitis, I attribute the clumps to me not stripping her completely out while she raises her kids and when they leave, she is holding back for a few days til she realizes that she doesn't have kids to empty her...the lumps to me are the result of milk that "plugs" the orifice of the teats.
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    So have you actually tested the milk for mastitis? Yes high producers are more prone to mastitis.
     
  5. milk and honey

    milk and honey Senior Member

    Oct 30, 2010
    Everett, WA
    I use the teat dip that Fiasco Farm.com uses with clorox in it... She swears by it...
     
  6. klingshirnm

    klingshirnm New Member

    53
    Mar 3, 2011
    I milk twice a day. The clumps or whatever didn't start at first, about a week ago. We take the kids off at birth, so I know what the milk look likes. Just started seeing the clumps after a month in. The milk results are not back yet, still waiting. But, the herds we got or goats from haven't had a had a problem with mastitis like we have. The 2 herds are both closely related(one is from my wife's old 4-h advisor, and the other was a fellow member which somewhat started the same way we did. We all share the same bucks.) So, I have a hard time with genetics playing a role, but I really don't know. Maybe we should get rid of all our goats and start new. Don't want to but our genetics are all higher producing does.
     
  7. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Is it just a couple clumps at the beginning of milking or is the udder hard and is their blood in the milk?
     
  8. klingshirnm

    klingshirnm New Member

    53
    Mar 3, 2011
    Well, there was one time there was a speck of blood. Some days we get little to no clumps, and some days, like this morning, the filter was almost completely covered, and some of the clumps are stringy. Everything I've read says stringy most of the time is mastitis. But, I would think it would be constant, and not occasional. Plus, her production has not fallen a bit, actually has gone up. The last 24 hours, she produced the most so far. She is eating normal, well normal for her. She has always eaten at a different pace. Same for her mother. Our milk sample results should be back any time. Just waiting, but afraid of waiting too long if something isn't right, but will have exact cause if it is mastitis.
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Well I know that each teat has a plug in it and if you are milking multiple does then you will get multiple stringy plugs in the pail of milk.

    THis is totally normal.
     
  10. klingshirnm

    klingshirnm New Member

    53
    Mar 3, 2011
    It is only one doe being milked. I want to say that I feel something in one side of her udder as I milk. Not a lump or anything like that, almost feels like loose skin. I know that souinds like mastitis, but I can't figure out how to explain it. My wife milked last night and didn't feel anything, and the filter came out clean. Everything that I can figure out is if it is mastitis it would be staph. Doe isn't phased a bit by it, eating normal milk output is still continuing to grow, up to 12.5lbs yesterday. That is the most we have gotten so far. Hopefully the milk tests will be in today. Seems to be taking forever.
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    well my limited experience is if she had mastitis then milk production goes down and they go off feed and act sick. To me your doe doesnt sound to have mastitis. But if its a mild case then I guess its possible.

    Im interested in knowing the milk test results.
     
  12. klingshirnm

    klingshirnm New Member

    53
    Mar 3, 2011
    Well, it is mastitis. It is a mild case though, and it is a form a staph. My wife works at a small animal vet, and none of the doctors have ever heard of the strain. Either it isn't common in small animals, or it is rare. My wife sent the results to our goat vet, and waiting back on a reply. I sure hope we can find a way to fix this. Really don't want to have every goat we have get this type of mastitis. There has to be something we can do. I know there are vaccines available for some strains, not sure of their effectiveness, but mainly for staph aureus.
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Oh frustrating - hope you get a good outcome soon.