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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok still hot mess around here, we hear from my sons Ag teacher and it appears that there are some goats that are in dire need of housing, possibly re homed. I would think they are healthy? by virtue of surviving the tornado? Would the risk out weigh helping? Is there something to look for?

At this point there is nowhere for them to go farm was destroyed, and unless something happens they days are numbered. It appears they are Pygmy fainting goat crosses. We really want to stick to the Kikos, but honestly what is it going to hurt having a few more around we have the room and means for long term care.

Thoughts
 

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Ok still hot mess around here, we hear from my sons Ag teacher and it appears that there are some goats that are in dire need of housing, possibly re homed. I would think they are healthy? by virtue of surviving the tornado? Would the risk out weigh helping? Is there something to look for?

At this point there is nowhere for them to go farm was destroyed, and unless something happens they days are numbered. It appears they are Pygmy fainting goat crosses. We really want to stick to the Kikos, but honestly what is it going to hurt having a few more around we have the room and means for long term care.

Thoughts
Do you test your herd? Are these tested? Do you have a place you can keep them in quarantine for thirty days? If these animals do not fit your program do not take them for pity. If the owner just needs a safe space for them until they can get their place in order and you have the space.... make a plan with the owner. Feed, hay, care etc. just because they survived the tornado does not mean healthy.... it just means they found a safe place to hide.

I KNOW i sound harsh here but this is how we deal with it. We cannot afford to be keeping all the strays and cute lil things that have no purpose on our farm. I want to be able to keep the ones that fit into my program.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That sounds safe enough. Pretty much the rule of thumb is no nose to nose contact for 30 days when it comes to quarantine so I would just keep them in that area and not use it for 30 days to be safe. If you want to be super safe just bleach down equipment and trash any bedding.
We haul all the bedding into our compost pile and it cooks a bit before being used to fill low spots or for the garden.

I do not want to be harsh by the same token I want to help as well. I think I am going to let them know they can bring Hay and feed and put it in the spare barn and I will help them move it back there etc.

Were going to keep cattle back there but right now prices are too low to go in that direction.
 

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I’ve taken rescues. I keep them in a stall in the cow barn for 30+ days and treat them for anything they may have and test them for everything under the sun. They have no contact with the goats until I’m satisfied they are clean and I’ve slowly change feed to the same as the regulars.
It is a risk but it can be a controlled risk.
 

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I think the biggest risk would be putting your own goats on the same pasture or shelters later on. If any of the rescue goats shed pus from CL abcesses or are Johne's positive and pass the bacteria in their feces, you'll want to keep your goats away from the area for approximately 1 year. You can also track these bacterias on your shoes/boots/clothes from the rescues back to your herd, so you may want to put some bleach foot baths at both places so you remember to disinfect before interacting with both herds.

Kudos and I hope they can be saved!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
@W Dean - did you end up hosting some goats from the tornado damage?
Yes, in light of everything I have asked that they supply feed, Hay etc. it's not that much extra work, so I am caring for them myself. My plan was to have them care for the goats, but given all the variables, I think it's best to do it myself. That way I don't have to worry about gates getting closed, having to be home at certain times etc.

we are taking precautions, bleach in a pan with water for cleaning boots which is in front of entry points for the pastures, also I have put soap out at the hydrant so I can wash my hands before interacting with our gang.
It may seem excessive, but we want to ensure the health and safety of our herd.
 

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Just to consider.
After all my panic research regarding a CL case, I have several times read that bleach will be rendered ineffective when overly contaminated with dirt/poop.
You will want to stomp off or scrub off your boots prior to the bleach dip for true certainty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just to consider.
After all my panic research regarding a CL case, I have several times read that bleach will be rendered ineffective when overly contaminated with dirt/poop.
You will want to stomp off or scrub off your boots prior to the bleach dip for true certainty.
Thanks
 
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