What are these?

Discussion in 'The Chatter Box' started by FarmGirl18, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    I had a lady email me saying she found these 3 "goats" wandering around. She was wondering what breed they were...but I'm thinking are they even goats? They look rather like sheep to me. Any ideas on what they are?
     

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  2. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

    112
    Aug 9, 2008
    Midwest
    Those are sheep. :)
     

  3. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Those are sheep...not sure on breed, they sure are cute!
     
  4. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

    112
    Aug 9, 2008
    Midwest
    By the looks of the pics, they may be a hair sheep breed. Often hair sheep wont completely loose all their fleece and you have clumps stuck like the one does in the picture.

    Shearing would of gotten that clump.
    Unless, it was a real bad shear job.

    Hope their owners are found.
     
  5. all1965

    all1965 New Member

    381
    Oct 6, 2007
    AR
    They are haired sheep.
    We had some St. Croix at the farm I worked at and they resemble them a lot. The St.Croix were more of a cream color though.
    Also, are those hay strings tied around their feet and legs?
     
  6. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    Okay, guys thanks! Thats what I was thinking this morning, hair sheep. :)

    all1965 not sure what is around their feet and legs. :shrug:
     
  7. liz

    liz Active Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Yep, look like sheep to me also...and the twine around their feet was probably ID of sorts when they when they were loaded into the slaughterhouse/auction truck and even more probale that is where they escaped from....have her check local auction barns and slaughter houses....someone probably already paid for the "lost sheep" and figure them "gone"
     
  8. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    A neighbor of mine raises those, they aren't a hair sheep but they are some kind of special variety and a lot of people think they look like goats. Sorry but I can't remember the breed.
     
  9. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    Thanks for the input everybody. Not sure what she is planning on doing with them...I have no idea where they came from.
     
  10. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    They somewhat look alot and shed out like my American Blackbelly sheep. I would guess that they are a part balckbelly.

    You can look at my site, and I have pics of them under other animals. The coloring is a bit different but the body, hair, and horns look like mine. Are they tame?
     
  11. Sweet Gum Minis

    Sweet Gum Minis New Member

    Oct 6, 2007
    Easley, SC
    It might be wise to see if they're missing from someone's farm. I mean they may have gotten out a spot in the fence and be missing to someone.
     
  12. gnomes'n'goats

    gnomes'n'goats New Member

    131
    Oct 8, 2007
    Under a mushroom
  13. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

    112
    Aug 9, 2008
    Midwest
    Not Kats, maybe muttlys. :)
    JFI
    I used to raise Kats.
    They are a polled breed with both ram and ewe being polled.
    One of those sheep have horns.
    Also, they are a large and heavy built breed and the ones here are small built.

    Here is a page to a list and descriptions of some breeds of hair sheep.
    http://www.raftersb.com/abouthairsheepbreeds.htm

    There are a lot of different breeds.
     
  14. gnomes'n'goats

    gnomes'n'goats New Member

    131
    Oct 8, 2007
    Under a mushroom
    Polled eh? Hmmm...
    Maybe they're part Jacob? :shrug:
     
  15. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

    112
    Aug 9, 2008
    Midwest
    If they were part Jacob the odds are they wouldnt have hair, they would have wool.
    I have Jacobs too and cross breed. :)
    All lambs born to our Kat and Jacob cross, were wool covered.
    From everyone I know you get wool or a wool hair blend sometimes happens, with there being more wool than hair.
    It usually takes away from the wool for fiber as hairs will often be scattered throughout making it difficult to separate for spinning.
    But you do get a nice meat lamb from crossing. :)
    Hair sheep are a meat breed and even crossing with the smaller framed wool breeds, the meat yield is still high.
     
  16. gnomes'n'goats

    gnomes'n'goats New Member

    131
    Oct 8, 2007
    Under a mushroom
    Oh duh. My brain is not functioning today! Of course Jacobs are wool sheep. Sorry. LOL
    Out of curiosity (cuz I like Jacobs) are Jacobs very good meat sheep or no?
    Maybe those sheep are part Barbado Blackbelly something or others.
    hmmmm...
     
  17. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I do think they have Blackbelly in them -------
     
  18. Ivy

    Ivy New Member

    112
    Aug 9, 2008
    Midwest
    Jacobs themselves are a small breed yielding less meat than duals.
    All sheep can be eaten and any can be delicious providing good age, younger is better and such.

    I like crossing Leicester breeds with a Jacob ram for the following reasons....
    Leicester are a fantastic dual breed. Large size, great meat, and fabulous wool.
    Crossing gives us lambs as fantastic in growth rate and fiber as the Leicester, but a firmer build and they are extremely hardy.
    The Jacob ram being small aides in small birth lambs, but they still grow at extremely fast rates.
    Our little black ewe there is almost as tall and long as mom Leicester and she is 3 months old.
    She was a single and 10 pounds, slender built at birth.
    So birth size being small is easy for the ewes.

    The Jacob ram being a small breed is easier to handle for both human and ewes. :)

    I wouldnt do Jacobs for dual without crossing because they dont yield as much meat.
    Their fiber also isnt as silky and curly as the Leicesters.
    They have a wonderful fiber, but its more cotton like and without the fantastic curl, more frizzy.

    I blend my Leicester with the Jacob fiber for a better balance and more softness. The Jacob fiber alone is more course, but fluffy. The two fiber types make a nice bouncy, poofy, yet silky yarn thats softer than commercial wool.