What Do I DO??? French Alpine Vs. American

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by SkyesRanch, Mar 17, 2011.

  1. SkyesRanch

    SkyesRanch New Member

    694
    Nov 11, 2010
    Stephenville, Texas
    Okay tell me pros and cons! I want French but I can't hardly find any! Its all americans. What is the diffrence? I know you get an American by breeding a French to American. So confused. :shrug:
     
  2. JessaLynn

    JessaLynn New Member

    Aug 29, 2009
    NW Ohio
    Here's alittle history I dug up for ya :wink:

    French Alpines

    In 1922, Dr. Charles P. Delangle with the aid of Mrs. Mary E. Rock, her brother Dr. Charles O. Fairbanks, Frenchman Joseph Crepin (author of La Chevre in 1918), and others imported the first documented group of French Alpines; 18 does and 3 bucks. These goats came from France where the Alpine is the most popular breed. The French had bred their version of the Alpine to a consistent size and very productive animal. All purebred Alpines in the United States descend from this importation. One of the imported does, owned by Mary Rock, lived until December 1933. In 1942 Corl Leach, longtime editor of the Dairy Goat Journal describes French Alpines; "Color varies greatly and ranges from pure white through various shades and tones of fawn, gray, piebald, and brown to black." There was not a single doe of the Cou Blanc variety in the 1922 importation. In France there was no breed recognized separately as "French Alpine". Dr. Delangle and the French considered all Swiss type goats of the "Alpine race". In France, Alpines are called "Alpine polychrome" meaning of many colors. One of the great things about raising Alpines is the anticipation of the color markings of each new kid.

    Dr. Delangle's herd name was "Alpine Goat Dairy" but it was short lived. He was in poor health and had conflicts with a number of goat breeders including the Board of Directors of the American Milk Goat Record Association (AMGRA). On August 20, 1923 he was expelled from AMGRA. He sold and gave away his herd thereafter and the rest of his history is also a mystery.

    American Alpines

    American Alpines are an American original. This breed is the result of crossbreeding with French or American Alpines. This program has brought in genetics from several breeds as explained above and gives the American Alpine one of the largest genetic pools of any goat breed in America. The results have been dramatic with American Alpines setting production records, winning at shows and being a generally larger stronger animal than the original French version. American Alpines represent the success of hybrid vigor.

    Today’s Alpines are a versatile utility animal. Alpine wethers make excellent Pack Goats. Alpine does make excellent milkers for both home and commercial dairies. Alpines produce a high volume of milk. They have the ability to milk through, meaning that they can produce over a period of one to three years between freshenings. This produces valuable year round milk and reduces breeding costs. Alpine milk has a high cheese yield because of good butterfat and protein content. They produce well on pasture or in dry-lotted hay fed conditions. They are known for being exceptionally hardy, curious, and friendly. The beauty and intrigue of Alpine colors make them appealing to everyone.

    In 1999 ADGA registered a total of 8,797 Alpines making them the second most popular breed in America. This was up from 8,343 in 1990. American Alpines exceeded purebreds by more than 2 to 1. Alpine production records have exceeded 4,000 pounds of milk. Alpines led all breeds in average milk production for animals on test in 1998 with 2031 milk and 72/ 3.5% butterfat.
     

  3. JessaLynn

    JessaLynn New Member

    Aug 29, 2009
    NW Ohio
    I love them both but I'm somewhat bias towards my French.They seem to produce more and longer then my Americans.Also have to say that the butterfat is somewhat higher then my Americans as well. My advice if you can't find French then find an American with a good pedigree that shows you number of days of lactation and butterfat content.Also a nice well attached udder is always important!
     
  4. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    I love my French's. I have considered getting an American before but just can't do it, lol. I am biased though.

    Frenchs are purebred. Americans' have another breed in there somewhere, could be way back, but it's some where in there and can never be considered purebred again, so you have american.

    There are some big herds up around you, and really nice ones too. You can also check ADGA members too.
    Is there something specific your looking for doe, buck, kids?
     
  5. Dreamchaser

    Dreamchaser New Member

    Oct 29, 2008
    Camp Verde, AZ
    I have both and love them both!
     
  6. SkyesRanch

    SkyesRanch New Member

    694
    Nov 11, 2010
    Stephenville, Texas
    Thanks guys, Well I'm OCD and the thought of my goats not being 100% would kill me. (Mini Alpines and Mini Sables are exceptions) lol I'm gonna stick with French. lol
     
  7. JessaLynn

    JessaLynn New Member

    Aug 29, 2009
    NW Ohio
    I know the feeling.I'm somewhat like that to.Infact if my Americans didn't have Olentangy lines..I wouldn't have them right now and instead stick with french
     
  8. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    If you were to look at a french and an american side by side you couldnt tell the difference. French alpines go back to one of twelve animals originally brought to the united states. Americans in some cases are still purebreds, they've just had a generation lost somewhere along the way, or they have a different breed in there somewhere. one is not superior over the other other in the bucket or the show ring. its just a personal preference. When i had goats i had both. The nice thing about having french is you can market your for sale animals (especially bucks) to both french and american herds. when all your offspring are american you can only market sales to american herds.
     
  9. Starr

    Starr New Member

    1
    Mar 13, 2012
    I have a question re: a French Alpine buck missing a horn. I'm a total nubie (no pun intended) but I have an opportunity to have him for free and haven't seen a pix but he's supposedly sweet with lovely manners and I don't really care what he looks like but do horns grow back? I haven't a clue.

    Hi, OK scratch this question. Just got off the phone with his owner and although he is quite charming and beautiful as his only horn has now shimmied to the center of his head making him look like a unicorn, he is in rut and over 220 lbs. which I wasn't expecting or can even manage. Seems like 2 other people with probably alot more knowledge are seeing him tomorrow. To save his dignity. I am meeting via phone some of the most hilarious people.........loving the goat world.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
  10. ptgoats45

    ptgoats45 Goat Girl

    Nov 28, 2011
    NE Oklahoma
    I only have one French doe, the rest are Americans. Like Sparks said there really is no difference. Americans are only "American" because they have an outcross somewhere or a missing generation. All of my girls produce the same and give similar amounts of butterfat. Americans show the same and do just as well as the French goats. Americans win at Nationals year after year, just as much as the French goats do. Now that I am getting some Saanens, I have found that almost all Saanens in my area are American. I did find a purebred doe and got some semen from the breeder to AI her with, but he even said that purebred Saanens are few and far between.

    If you looked at my herd, or anyone else's herd you wouldn't be able to pick out the French does and the American does. IMO an Alpine is an Alpine wether they have one A or two A's in front of their registration number.
     
  11. ptgoats45

    ptgoats45 Goat Girl

    Nov 28, 2011
    NE Oklahoma
    Just noticed you have Saanens too. Are they American or purebred?