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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I’m new to this so I was wondering what should I start out with purebred or commercial,
What’s the advantage to each one , my goal is to have quality kids to sale for 4-H .
Any advice would be greatly appreciate
 

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What breed are you looking to buy? Generally, registered stock is more valuable than commercial. However, if you’re selling wethers, papers are quite useless. 4H may want papers for breeding stock, but I’m not entirely sure.

Biggest piece of advice is to purchase a good quality animal regardless. If there’s a commercial doe that comes from a healthy and reputable herd for a good price, then it’ll be worth more to you than a registered doe that isn’t nearly as nice for more money.
 

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Commercial show can be just as valuable as registered. The little girl that won two years ago with her market weather paid $2,500 for him. I thought this was insane (still do to be honest) since that’s what I paid for my buck but then I found out that these kids are not just buying animals simply for the fair but entering them in jackpots. That little girl won way more then $2,500 before it ever went to the fair. So there is definitely money to be made in the commercial show goats.
BUT IMO I would go with registered. You can always sell a registered animal as commercial but you can never sell a commercial as registered, so it gives you the option to play both sides of the field. If you are totally set on just 4H/FFA as buyers then look into fairs around you and see if they offer registered classes at the fair. The fairs around here are just now starting to offer them, which is very annoying since they have offered it to every other species for years now, but that’s a rant for another time ;)
 

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Yes! Jessica is right. I’ve seen wethers sell for $2000-5000+ easy. It definitely blew my mind the first time I saw that lol.

The competitive wether market is an exception and a completely different animal than your typical commercial or registered boers. Wether bred bucks are does have a drastically different style in both body and growth to produce the ideal wether.
 

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It costs the same to feed a great goat as it does an average one.
And the average one may actually cost more in the meantime.

With a good goat, especially registered, there is a history you can look at and decide if it will work for your situation.

I'm not slamming sales barns (I kind of am, sorry) but, dont buy a foundation animal from a sale barn, chances are, it won't work out as well as you'd like. Good luck in your endeavor!
 

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Yes! No matter if you decide registered or not always get the best you can. If you can only aim for one thing though make it your buck! He is going to be half your herd, and even if you have so so does he will be the fastest way to breed your herd up. Now I’m a registered person ;) but commercial doesn’t mean that the animal is no good. There’s a market for commercial as well, you just need to decide if it’s right for you. One thing though, and goats rock kinda dipped into it, yes registered goats you can really trace back some lines. With the commercial you really only have what someone tells you. I thought about this the other day when I saw a add on FB of a little jackpot commercial doe. This was sired by “Bob” out of “Mary” blah blah blah. And I’m assuming these names mean something in the commercial world, but really what proof is there? But it was a week old kid and people were going nuts over her because who it’s sire and dam are. But with registered you know for sure what lines you are and are not buying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Let me just say thanks to everyone that take the time to answer my question it is truly appreciate.

Ok after I decided which way I’m going ether commercial or purebred What are some of the things people look for in deciding on an animal to purchase? Iv been watching a lot of videos and for the life of me they all really look the same . Is there a book or video I could get to help understand it a little better or is it just learned over time ?
 

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There's a little bit of variance in the different styles, so there isn't necessarily one answer. A wether bred buck wouldn't do well in an ABGA show and vice versa. You'll definitely learn the difference over time. I suggest going on Facebook and joining some goat groups!

I know you're looking at breeding for 4H, but I'll explain the different styles to maybe help guide you.

If you want to breed competitive wethers, you'll be looking at bucks and does with more tubular bodies, clean hides, more muscle in the rack and loin, etc. They're also slower growing. Boer breed characteristics such as roman noses and pendulous ears don't matter. Google and check out the Livestock Judging Guide to Market Goats from the University of Tennessee. It has diagrams and explanations that you could find helpful!

If you want to breed the South African styled boers, I recommend this PDF that has plenty of information, pictures, and diagrams. It's almost the opposite of wether style - deep bodies, huge wrinkles, roman nose, etc. It also is super helpful in just showing basic goat structure that is important to understand. I find it very helpful in explaining terminology: http://www.boerboksa.co.za/Documents/2016 Boerbok Studenteboek.pdf

If you want to just breed ABGA show stock, you can refer to the SA diagrams, but you may see some slight variants in structure for what wins in the ring. Bucks and does tend to be a little more feminine than they were originally meant to be. You can reference the ABGA National Shows. I think they're posted on their Facebook page. You can see past winners as well.

Commercial meat producers want deep, wide bodies with plenty of muscle. These will be much faster growers than wether stock, since the goal is to sell for meat as quick as possible. They don't care about the fancy headsets or pretty necks like show stock. They want functionality and high turnover rates.

Commercial or registered stock for your local 4H fairs can really be any style you like the most. Maybe even a blend.

In the end, all styles want a structurally sound animal from the ground up - strong pasterns, straight legs, level back, wide body, nice muscling, etc.
 
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