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So far I have only made queso blanco, but it left me with a lot of whey, which not knowing what to do with it finally got tossed out. I am not a big ricotta cheese eater so I am wondering what do others do with the whey that is left after making cheese?
 

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We have made queso blanco twice now. We just made some cream cheese today. It is super hot here, as in 115F today, so we freeze the whey and feed it to the chickens. I have also given some of the unflavored stuff to the dogs too. About have of it is diluted with water and used to water the garden. :D I have also read that you can soak grains in raw whey or use it in place of water in recipes or when cooking rice.
 

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Use it to replace the liquid in bread.
Starter for lacto-fernmented veggies.
Soak grains in before cooking.
Make gjetost (sounds like yay toast). Simply boil it until it is like pudding (it takes a few hours, give or take depending on how much whey you have). Using a stick blender at the end helps get rid of the graininess that can occur while boiling. It is ready when scraped over to one side of the pan, it doesn't run back. Pour it into a container such as a bread pan to firm up, then slice thin and enjoy. :) It is a sweet, soft Norwegian cheese. Be sure to use fresh whey, or it may be to salty.
 

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Goatless goat momma
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it can go in the garden or give it to the animals. i'm going to try making soap with it.... you can also use it in sauces and soups in place of water.
 

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GRANDMOTHER BREAD (Whey Bread)
Adapted from Chickens in the Road, Breads, the Farmhouse Table

3 cups warm ricotta whey or warm water 1 tablespoon yeast (1 packet)
1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup sugar
7 cups all-purpose flour

In a large bowl, combine warm water, yeast, sugar, and salt. Let sit five minutes until
slightly bubbly.
Stir in first three cups of flour with a heavy spoon. Add the next cup of flour a little at a time
as needed, stirring until dough becomes too stiff to continue stirring easily. Add a little more
flour and begin kneading. The amount of flour is approximate Continue adding flour and
kneading until the dough is smooth and elastic. (I generally set the timer for 10 minutes and
knead for that long.)
Let the dough rise in a greased, covered bowl until doubled, about an hour. Uncover bowl;
sprinkle in a little more flour and knead a few more time. Form into an even ball and divide
the dough in half. With floured hands, shape dough into loaves and place in two greased
loaf pans. Tear off two pieces of waxed or parchment paper and grease with oil spray (to
prevent it from sticking to the loaves as they rise) and cover loaf pans. Let loaves rise for
about an hour. Bake for 25 minutes in a preheated 350-degree oven. Makes two loaves.
Recipe can be cut in half.

BEST bread EVER!!! The flavor is fantastic and it's super easy to make. Like everyone else said...use it wherever you need to add water to a recipe. You can also drink it. You know the powdered whey protein you buy? This is the same thing before it's dehydrated. I've used some to mix up juice too without my family knowing...adds some protein to help balance out the sugars! I'm not a huge ricotta fan either, but you can use it in quiche (I had dozens of eggs to use up along with the goats milk so we ate a LOT of quiche) or lasagna OR....

Ricotta, Basil, and Cracked Black Pepper, Olive Oil Ice Cream
Weight or Volume Ingredients
6 tablespoons black peppercorns
1 cup manufacturing cream
6 tablespoons basil leaves
2 ½ cups ricotta
1 lemon zest
1 cup sugar
1 pinch kosher salt
6 tablespoons basil, blanched, chopped
1 tablespoon limoncello
½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Toast and coarsely crack the peppercorns. Add half of the pepper to the cream and bring to a simmer. Cover. Turn heat off and let steep 30 minutes. Strain through an etamine and then chill cream. When cream is cold, bring some heavily salted water to a boil and briefly dunk basil leaves. Remove and immediately add to cold cream. Bring cream to a simmer. Cover. Turn heat off and let steep for 30 minutes. Place in a blender and puree. Strain through an etamine. Put ricotta, zest, sugar, and salt in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add limoncello and strained cream. Blend. Refrigerate until well chilled. Add reserved black pepper, chopped basil, and olive oil. Mix well. Freeze in ice cream maker.
If you want to go over the top, after you top the ice cream with fresh strawberries drizzle with some aged balsamic such as http://www.m5corporation.com/Il-Grande-Vecchio-100-Year-Aged-Balsamic-Vinegar-p/m1940.htm
 

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I use mine for bread... But I have made gjetost, too! (Not my favorite cheese, but my family likes it). It's cool to see someone else who knows what it is!
 

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I just caught the part about lacto-fermenting veggies....if you use an acid to make your cheese (such as vinegar) you can't use it to lacto-ferment.

I cook rice in it (adds a lot of protein to the rice) Cook veggies in it, anything that calls for water....substitute the whey. Or...give it to the chickens or pigs or whatever animals might need the extra nutrition. Keep in mind this is what the whey powder you buy from the store is made out of. Lots of nutrition in it since it's not highly processed like the powder
 
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