What if I did nothing...

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by jdragr, May 17, 2018.

  1. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    So this is in the newbie forum... :)

    I bought 4 ND doe bottle babies. I never gave them any shots, tested them for anything, or wormed them.

    I bought a ND buck and did the same.

    I now have 7 new babies...and I know I need to figure out this husbandry thing but I don't even know where to start. They do have lose minerals.

    Please be gentle...what do I do first?
     
    nehimama likes this.
  2. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    Nothing to be gentle about! Goats shouldn’t be wormed on any kind of schedule and a lot of people don’t vaccinate against anything.
    Are all of the fist goats you mentioned adults now? Are these their offspring? There is something called coccidiosis and it is a terrible thing. It is very common for small kids to get this and either be stunted or die once they get a high load. A lot of people, myself included, do a preventive treatment and treat kids every 3 weeks to be on the safe side. There are also people who do not do this too though. I didn’t till I started having issues, but when I had issue they were bad issues!
    Worming, don’t worm unless they need it. If they are nice and fat, good pink inner eye lid color, healthy looking coats they are probably fine. If anything makes you question it send In a fecal sample and see what worms your dealing with and go from there. Since your new sending one out wouldn’t be a bad thing just to see if you are correct on what you are seeing.
    Vaccines is kinda a personal choice as well as what kind of issues are going on in your herd and area. Two vaccines I totally recommend is CDT (over eating disease and tetanus) and something for pneumonia. My reason for these are, these things can strike fast with no warning and no way to save the animals so vaccinating is a small insurance. No vaccine is 100% though so never rule any disease out simply because they have been vaccinated. But other vaccines like against mastitis, chlamydia, sore mouth and such, there is no point in vaccinating against unless you run into these problems.
    And great job on the minerals! This is something many new goat owners have no idea about
     
    nehimama likes this.

  3. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    Yes, all 4 does are adults now. They are 2. I didn't breed them until they were 1. Yes, my babies are their offspring. I have read 3 books and read on here even though I don't post a lot. But I just get confused about what I'm supposed to do.

    I do have some coats that have faded. So I am guessing even with the loose minerals they need copper. I can give them replamin gel for that....correct? Do I give it to the babies or just the adults?

    Worming - get a fecal from each adult and send it off. But not the babies?

    As for vaccines I need to give CDT and pneumonia... I'm assuming the adults and babies?

    They have a large pasture. Get a little grain every morning. Have plenty of fresh water. And have hay.

    If I'm missing anything I should be doing please let me know. And thank you!!!!
     
  4. lifesabtchlearn2deal

    lifesabtchlearn2deal Active Member

    251
    Mar 26, 2018
    The only other thing I can think of which could just be me because I'm terrified of the issue coming up is I do check all of my goats once every two weeks or less...depends when I think about it but always atleast twice a month if not 4 times is check for lice. Especially in my babies. I've had the issue of every goat I've ever bought being covered in lice even tho the sellers told me their goats don't have it lol I still checked them as soon as I got home to make sure. I know of they get over run with it they can get anemic
     
    jdragr likes this.
  5. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    I suppose the first thing I would recommend is to separate the buck and then wean any bucklings at 8 weeks old (or wether them). Otherwise your does will get bred right back again (if they aren't already) and the doelings will be bred far too young. It can be very hard on them to be bred continuously. Yes the buck will breed his daughters given any opportunity.
     
  6. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    67
    May 17, 2018
    You do NOT need to vaccinate, and you should really research the topic before injecting all sorts of genetically modified organisms, animal byproducts and toxic chemicals into your animals.

    There are hundreds of herds that have successfully raised goats for decades and have never used vaccinations of any kind.

    A friend of mine told me that some of her goat kids developed entero and she lost all of them because the antitoxin is no longer working as there is a new strain that is becoming a problem
    throughout our area. You might have already heard about the new Clostridial strain as so many vets are aware of it now. So the real-world in-the-field news is that the vaccine isn't providing any protection against this new strain since the vaccine was developed using a different strain of the C perfringens bacteria, and the antitoxin isn't working for the same reason. This was what was told to her by her vet. Another friend had the same problem but successfully treated it with a natural treatment that she mail-ordered, which is called ClostridEaze.

    Google Juliette de Bairacli Levy and get her book on livestock and the following article:
    Vaccinations: A Word of Caution for Our Animals by Dr. Will Falconer on Fias Co Farm's web site.

    Also google VaccinesRevealed.com and I'll post more soon.
     
    jdragr likes this.
  7. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    The buck is separated. We did that when we knew it was close to time. He isn't happy about it.

    We are already seeing one of the bucklings being "bucky". Do I worry about that?

    And I told my husband that the does needed a break. He thought we should breed again for a fall kidding. Who is correct?
     
    catharina likes this.
  8. lifesabtchlearn2deal

    lifesabtchlearn2deal Active Member

    251
    Mar 26, 2018
    I am only willing to breed my does once a year but I only breed when I know I have enough people wanting to buy them. I'm not the type to take mine to a sale barn. They're my babies and their babies are just as precious to me. So I have where I'm only breeding in November December area like right before thanksgiving to around christmas. I do know people who do breed constant and it seems their does are constantly looking run down and from talking to them they don't live as long. So that made me just be like no ty
     
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  9. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    67
    May 17, 2018
    Yes, you need to worry when the bucklings start showing interest in the girls, but mini breeds can start that behavior before weaning time so you want to be sure that they are of weaning age before separating. But definitely if he's old enough to be weaned, that is what you should've done as "bucky" behavior can lead to unwanted outcomes or breeding accidents.

    It is in the best interest of any doe to only breed her once a year, if her health is important to you. It can be done more often, but they do suffer for it.
     
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  10. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    67
    May 17, 2018
  11. Goat_Scout

    Goat_Scout Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2017
    Louisiana
    In addition to everybody else’s advice, I would highly recommend testing your entire herd (yearly) for Johnes, CAE and CL. By entire herd, I mean everyone 1 year old and up. I actually think I read somewhere that Johnes can’t be detected until they’re over 2 years old, but for CAE and CL it’s 1 year+.

    I also just started doing cocci prevention with my kids, as well as check the adults’ lower eyelids (FAMANCHA score) almost daily (it takes only a second to do if the goat is tame). I have had a lot of trouble with Barber Pole worms (last year we lost 1, almost 2 goats to it and the darn thing just keeps popping up!) so I’ve been keeping a close eye on everybody - which is pretty easy because I have each of my milkers on the stanchion 2x daily.
     
    catharina likes this.
  12. Goat_Scout

    Goat_Scout Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2017
    Louisiana
    Two of my does last fall were bred only 3 months post kidding. One of them we had bought already pregnant, but the other one we had bred ourselves because I wanted to avoid summer kidding here in Louisiana (it starts getting horribly hot even in April, and also late winter/early spring kidding seems to help avoid parasite problems in the kids) and so, after making sure she was in great body condition we put her in with the buck.
    They both seemed to be a little more pulled down after kidding (each with a single buckling) and weren’t giving much milk until we weaned their kids at 4 months old. If possible I will not breed that soon after kidding again, once a year is way easier on the doe and kids.
     
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  13. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    No kids can get a fecal done as well.
    And if I was sounding like I was saying you must vaccinate that was not what I was saying ;) it is your choice. I personally vaccinate and when asked about what people should vaccinate against I say CDT and pneumonia. But again your choice. A lot of people don’t vaccinate.
    As for the bucklings, so they are 7 months old? If so yes get them away from the girls and probably get ready for some kids. For the future bucklings will act interested at a very young age. Mine usually start humping each other at like 2 weeks old. Totally normal. I keep them with moms and don’t worry about anything till they start humping and the penis starts to come out. At that point they need to get away from the girls.
     
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  14. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon Coast Range
    At this point I would do a herd wide fecal just to see what's what. You do this by mixing one or two berries from each doe in one bag , they only need about eight, and one or two berries from the kids in another bag.
    This is a really good way to get a herd profile started. Just let the vet or lab know that it is a mixed sample.
    You might look up mid America research center. They do cheap mail- in fecals.
     
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  15. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    The buckling starting to show interest is 4 weeks old this past Thursday. So not quite weaning age. Any suggestions?

    I prefer to only breed once a year. I will tell my husband I am right. :)
     
  16. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    OK...need help here. How do I test for Johnes, CAE and CL?

    What do you mean by cocci prevention? I know to check their eyelids.
     
  17. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    I am for vaccinating so I appreciated the advice. We have horses as well and vaccinate them. No I only have one buck and he is separated. My bucklings are my new babies. One is 4 weeks old and the other 2 weeks old.
     
    catharina likes this.
  18. jdragr

    jdragr Member

    30
    Oct 7, 2016
    So you would do a herd instead of individual?
     
  19. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    67
    May 17, 2018
    The 4-week-old buckling is not quite old enough to do any harm so just wait until he is at least 8 weeks old before separating him. I've had Nigerian Dwarf goats for over 12 years now and have never had any problems at that age. At 4 weeks his digestive system and rumen are not fully developed yet.

     
  20. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    67
    May 17, 2018
    If you have a closed herd (meaning you are not acquiring new animals and adding them to your herd from different sources) and are not frequenting shows, auctions, etc., and the source(s) of your stock were disease-free, then testing for those diseases is not as much of a concern. You would need to contact a vet to test for those diseases.

    Cocci prevention can be as simple as a pinch of GI Soother put in their mouth once or twice a day. https://www.firmeadowllc.com/store/p436/Herb_Mix_GI_Soother™_DIgestive_System_Support_16_oz.html

     
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