The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
[quote:2vfc5vix]Don't forget to have some sort of Cocci treatment factored in as well.

Rex,
Can you explain that statement?

Tonia[/quote:2vfc5vix]
Coccidia are small protozoans (one-celled organisms) that multiply in the intestinal tracts of animals, most commonly in young animals less than one year of age. Here is a great link that talks about Cocci in depth. http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/artic ... sis06.html

Here is a link to another forum topic on this site that lists some normal treatments. viewtopic.php?f=24&t=150&hilit=Cocci

It is important to have some sort of prevention plan in place before you see the symptoms. Cocci can severely stunt the growth of a goat and in many cases the damage is already done by the time you notice the symptoms.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
595 Posts
Cocci are much worse where you have green rainy warmish weather in the spring. In the desert they don't live long enough to become the scourge they are here in the pacific NW.
They can kill kids as early as 3 weeks so if you live in a wet area you should be treating from exactly three weeks with Albon and at two weeks we start them on Deccox. Decoxx keeps them from multiplying so fast and Albon kills them outright. Deccox has to be mixed in their milk every day and albon is given for 5 days in a row every month.
It's worth talking to your vet about conditions in your area and treating appropriately. I've lost kids right after their first treatment at three weeks. That's how bad things are some years around here. Unlike worms, there are few or no symptoms, just all of a sudden an otherwise healthy appearing kid starts crying, goes down and is gone in a matter of hours.
It's nothing to play with.
Those who live where it's dry thank their lucky stars that you don't have to go through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Thank you for the new post. I live in Eastern Washington and we get about 12 inches of rain a year. Although it is raining, it is spring and we are usually very dry. We have yet to find a vet that does anything with goats. Is it safer to treat and be on the safe side?

Tonia
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
595 Posts
Absolutely. Better if you can find a vet to do fecals to see what is really going on but this is one thing that can't be reversed and kills kids without any warning. I hate and fear cocci.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top