What kind of ventilation for prefab shed?

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by Dylann, Jun 20, 2020.

  1. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Hi all! Uber newbie here in upstate New York trying to get ready for some fuzzy new friends, so just in the planning phase currently. If I'm trying to get appropriate air ventilation (draft-free, dry, healthy air circulation) inside of a 200 square foot prefab shed (sample pic attached), which of the following would you recommend:

    -one window on each side of the shed (allowing for a cross breeze) = 2 total
    -two windows on each side of the shed (allowing for a cross breeze) = 4 total
    -two windows only on one side of the shed on the south-facing side = 2 total
    -a cupola and vents all along the top of the shed with maybe one window
    -all of the above?!

    There will be two sets of double doors open all day, but closed at night with all animals inside for safety. Just wondering if leaving the windows open at night would create an unhealthy draft during pretty heavy winters and it would be better to have vents all along the top that are always open? Thanks for any help - much appreciated!
     

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  2. Ashlynn

    Ashlynn Well-Known Member

    440
    Sep 30, 2017
    Lutz, FL
    I would say vents towards the top of the shed and then one to two windows that can be closed if it gets too cold and drafty in winter, but open during the spring and summer.
     

  3. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Thank you! That's really helpful. If we have two windows in the shed along with vents put in, do you think it would be better to have them both on the same wall (pic 1), or to have one on each side opposite of each other (pic 2)? iu.jpeg iu-2.jpeg ?
     
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  4. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki
    Is it being built to your specifications or are you going to houdini it when you get it? If built to your specs...... lots of high windows. If you only do a few windows i would do them at both ends. Might put a fan up if you get really hot. That shed will get pretty toasty i think. Not sure how harsh your winters or summers are there. Here in nc and my barn.... we did three solid sides. Back facing the way the weather usually comes in, front is two doors in the middle and cattle panels across. So my front is pretty wide open.
     
  5. Ashlynn

    Ashlynn Well-Known Member

    440
    Sep 30, 2017
    Lutz, FL
    I think two windows on opposite sides would be good. I like pic 2 which makes me think 3 windows now lol.
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  7. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    Keep the North side solid. Most cold air comes from the North. South open for cooler inthe summer. I like 2 windows. Then i have vents ( like floor grates) that I.can open or close about 5 feet up.for a nice cross draft. That keeps ot from getting so dusty, but lets air.move thru.
     
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  8. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Ahh thank you ALL so much for your wonderful advice and feedback! Definitely great points. This will be a custom built shed so in trying to incorporate everything together for adequate ventilation...here's a diagram of what I'm thinking of ordering (North, East, South, and West directions indicated in caps). Thanks to your great point about high windows and vents, I'm actually going to ask them to install the windows upside down so I can pull them down to allow airflow as needed at the highest possible level, which should keep the lower part of the 200 sq foot shed less drafty. What do you think? Any suggestions/changes?

    IMG_7500.jpg
     
  9. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki

    Looks great. Love the window upside down idea too! Just make sure you can easily reach to open and close them.
     
  10. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    Are you going to have electrical in there? Water? Both are really nice in the winter! Lots of window are good too. A dark barn is no good!
    I know you will only have a small herd, but, manure does pile up rapidly. Will you hand shovel or will a small tractor help scrape out the manure and bedding?

    (You cannot believe how only a couple goats can fill a pen!)
     
  11. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Electrical no but water yes! Our plan is start out with 2-3 minis so at the moment hand shoveling is the plan. Speaking of though...the shed comes with a plywood floor and we've gone back and forth with keeping it in vs. having them build it without one, but ultimately leaving it in at least to start. Thinking of putting rubber mats on top though read lots about that both for and quite against lol. Others suggest concrete (and others opposed to concrete because of an ammonia smell lingering), pellets, and "you can't beat just plain old dirt!"

    If I haven't exhausted y'all yet, any experience or opinions on best flooring options on top of the shed plywood floor is more than welcome. :)
     
  12. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Thanks so much! Yes, another good point! :)
     
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  13. Ashlynn

    Ashlynn Well-Known Member

    440
    Sep 30, 2017
    Lutz, FL
    I have pens/shelters on dirt, a kid shelter on this hard plastic material, and a kidding stall on concrete. I like the concrete the best for if you only have a few goats. Concrete is easy to sweep, shovel, and vacuum. It can also be sprayed out or bleached. If you keep the wood floors I would put rubber mats over it just to keep the wood from staining or getting wet.
     
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  14. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Sounds great, thank you!!
     
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  15. HungryFox

    HungryFox Well-Known Member

    262
    Feb 6, 2020
    New England
    We have a similar shed.
    Plywood, especially the cheap kind common to prefab, is very bad news as flooring with goats. I learned the hard way.
    You could upgrade to more of a marine grade, could seal it heavily, could do an alternative as you mentioned, or a combination.
    If it were me and the build was coming with flooring installed, I would likely seal existing floor and add a surface material such as rubber mats. Over my rubber mats I use pellet stall bedding. It isn't everyone's first choice, but I find it superior to every other bedding I have used. I now even use it for brooders, rabbit cages, and in the hen house! Great stuff, absorbs and reduces odors, easy to shovel out and put in your compost later.

    I have major ventilation problems. I am not blessed with a nice double door, just a man door and 2 windows. I've been requesting more windows, but quite low priority.
    I can't stress enough, that a fan in the eaves would help tremendously.
    My shed is electrified but I would hate drawing that much power. I plan to invest in solar for the fan.


    And make sure it does not come drywalled LOL.
    Goats find that tasty.
     
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  16. K's boys

    K's boys Member

    44
    May 7, 2020
    Minnesota
    We just built ours here in the last few weeks, we have wood floors and sealed them to save on the urine built up and I sprinkle a very light layer of sweet pdz. Living up here in mn, you never know what season you're gonna get!...lol it has been working well I actually cant smell anything, but the goat berries. Love your floor plans and I wish I was a goat living there!
     
  17. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Thank you so much! Really appreciate the input and recommendation. Will definitely look into sealing existing floor and the pellet stall bedding. We wound up modifying the shed with double-hung windows on two sides (so they can be opened from the top enough for airflow without creating a draft in the lower part of the shed where the animals are), and two single-hung windows on the other two sides. The double doors will be open during the day, closed at night for protection. Putting roof ridge vent and working cupola in for extra ventilation!!
     
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  18. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    So nice to hear from others going this route! Can I ask what you sealed the floor with? How were the fumes afterward? Yes, here in upstate NY (not *quite* as cold as MN lol) there's snow in October and May sometimes!
     
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  19. Ashlynn

    Ashlynn Well-Known Member

    440
    Sep 30, 2017
    Lutz, FL
    Wood bedding is very absorbent, cheap, and a good option. I use it for my rabbit’s litter box. However, just note that when I tried it with the goats they wouldn’t even walk on it. I guess they didn’t like the feeling of it in between their hooves. I even tried putting a layer of hay on top and they still wouldn’t go on it. You would have to soften it by spraying it with water first. Unless yours are less picky. Only my kids and nursing does are in stalls, but in there I use wood shavings and hay that they pull down from their hay bag. My does are weird though lol, they only really pee in the corner, but poop everywhere so I only have to put shavings in the corners and hay where they nap. I like a blank floor and less stuff to sweep up of course.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
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  20. Dylann

    Dylann Member

    42
    Jun 20, 2020
    NY
    Good to know, thanks so much for all of your input!! :)
     
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