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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am pretty sure my Alpine doe Oreo is bred :) yay! I was just wondering how every one else cares for their girls during pregnancy?
 

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I don't do anything special. I usually feed grass/alfalfa hay year round, so I just keep doing that. My hay is tested, so I know what they are getting in terms of nutrition, though. As they get closer to kidding, I keep an eye on them and make sure they don't get that hollowed out look. If they do, I increase their hay by a pound or so. Congratulations, and happy kidding! :)
 

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I agree...
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You don't feed grain though- right ?
 

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I don't feed grain because I don't need to feed grain. If my hay was of the quality that I needed to feed grain to bring it up to par, you better believe I would be feeding it!
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is their any feed you should NOT feed? I thought I had read most ppl stop feeding grain
 

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Is their any feed you should NOT feed? I thought I had read most ppl stop feeding grain
I don't feed much grain in the spring and summer, because there is a lot of browse still. I still fed my kinder who was preggo all the way through, now she is milking so she gets the most out of anyone in my herd right now. The last month of pregnancy you shouldn't change or do anything different. That is when the babies grow is the last month, but if you are feeding grain now them I would continue. I have pretty good hay, but I will also give grain with some alfalfa pellets.
 

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This is my opinion. If they are carrying good weight and getting good hay, they don't need any grain or feed. Some people think feeding grain/feed late term will make the kids too big. I don't really buy into that. With the Boers you run into some does, that while carrying multiples, start running short on nutrition late term. I watch for does who's back bone starts protruding even though they look fat from the side. If a doe starts lagging behind the others and or appears to be walking on egg shells or quits eating all together, I get nervous. They need calcium late term. Either from alfalfa hay or pellets or from a balanced feed. What I would not personally feed is a COB sweet feed or other grain that is not balanced along with a hay that isn't alfalfa. If you are high in phosphorus and low in calcium, that can cause problems. Don't forget a good loose mineral with copper. I had a lot of problems my first year and I think most of them were caused by me feeding *too much* and the wrong kind of feed. I found this old article by a lady named Sue Reith on hypocalcemia and I credit the article for helping me manage my pregnant goats better. The first part of the article is about treating hypocalcemia, but if you scroll down, you can read how to prevent it. I've posted it before and I have no idea whether anybody reads it, but I will keep posting it because I think it's that good. :) I think managing does this way will also help prevent kidding problems as well.

http://kinne.net/hypocal2.htm
 
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