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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
If the bucklings are still nursing then catch the little boys and band them. Buy the tool and bands (bands are round and small rubber bands with a hole in the middle for the fingers of the tool to go into) from a farm and ranch store and it is very simple.You just need someone to help hold them until you can accomplish the task. Place the rubber band on the banding tool fingers and roll it down as far as it will go on the fingers then squeeze the handles of the tool together which will spread the band and then insert the scrotum of the buckling with both testicles through the hole in the band. Release the handles and twist the tool loose from the buckling. Its done and he is now a wether and cannot breed the girls. Wethers sell better at market than bucks. The older bucks should be culled and only the ones you want to keep as a breeder left and either nutter the others or send then to market. Then start maintenance on the remaining does and bucks. That is my advice.
As soon as the bucklings are old enough we plan on doing so!!
 

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Yes, if you plan to continue breeding and will be selling, disbudding future kids is necessary for the Nigerian market.
I just want to add in that this is radically area dependent. In my part of New England, horned Nigerians are pretty common, easily findable and easily saleable. We disbud our dairy does but I know several large ND farms where they will not disbud at all, even on request. So it's a matter of knowing your own area/potential market.
 

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My brother bought some property that came with livestock. He now has about 25 goats including the kids from this kidding season. We don't know the family tree of the goats AND the females and males are out in the pasture together. I'm worried that the males will mess with the does/kids...what should we do?
(Also the goats are all kinda skittish)
Very cute photos of your new herd! Where are you located? I would definitely get those males separated from the girls. You can look on amazon for a nonsexing apron looking that a male can wear. Thats what my billy is wearing now and they work pretty good. here is a picture below. I have my billy in with my females because he is really attached to one of girls. but this helps my billy goats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Very cute photos of your new herd! Where are you located? I would definitely get those males separated from the girls. You can look on amazon for a nonsexing apron looking that a male can wear. Thats what my billy is wearing now and they work pretty good. here is a picture below. I have my billy in with my females because he is really attached to one of girls. but this helps my billy goats.
In the south, we have some bad weather over here!! We separated the males (the rest are castrated) and as soon as the weather gets better they'll have their own pasture.
 

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I'm trying to get a handle on my herd and I've separated out the big boys from the females - too late, i'm sure, as I just had 3 kids in the last 2 weeks, 2 other does could possibly be pregnant. I left my pygmy boy with the does because the big boys pick on him, but getting all the males castrated this spring, my vet wanted to wait until then to do it. Then I should be able to turn them all loose together again, I hope. They were doing fine when they were all together before but I don't want to have to worry about more pregnancies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
I'm trying to get a handle on my herd and I've separated out the big boys from the females - too late, i'm sure, as I just had 3 kids in the last 2 weeks, 2 other does could possibly be pregnant. I left my pygmy boy with the does because the big boys pick on him, but getting all the males castrated this spring, my vet wanted to wait until then to do it. Then I should be able to turn them all loose together again, I hope. They were doing fine when they were all together before but I don't want to have to worry about more pregnancies.
Agreed!! We only have a few males that aren't castrated who are separated from the herd, and we'll separate the bucklings from their moms when they can be.
 

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Don't wait too long to separate those randy little boys! We had a surprise birth today- guess 3 months old was too old for a little Ober! (and a little lamancha bred a big mean doe, too!) First time in 15 years that has occured. I just didn't think that they could...... Being so small stature and all... (boy I feel dumb)
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 · (Edited)
Guys, I'm so stressed right now, I'm a worrier!! My brother wants to keep all his goats but also wants to end up breeding them later on in the future. I wanted him to have a "fresh start" so I suggested he sell some, and the answer was no. Obviously he has a hard time telling apart the kids so how is he going to remember which goat is which !! I know all the kids but those skittish does and bucks, nope! They didn't even have names when my brother bought the place (a lot still don't). A lot of the doelings and bucklings look a lot like their mommas so I worry when they have fully developed and are grown...how the heck are we supposed to remember who is who out of the whole herd ‍♀ FYI: There are like only two momma does that aren't skittish!! The kids always run away anyway ‍♀ so can't really tell if they're afraid or not...just yet.
We plan on only breeding those two does that aren't skittish again and some of the doelings when they're older of course!! (Probably will rent a buck and then breed some of the lines from the original herd {this seasons bucklings we aren't castrating}back in when we can)
 

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Tattoo them in the ears. Since they probably are not registered, Write down descriptions, take photos and then numerically tattoo their left ears. At least you will have some sort of record. Or, if the moms are already tattooed, document that and give the kids the letter "N" and a different number for each one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Tattoo them in the ears. Since they probably are not registered, Write down descriptions, take photos and then numerically tattoo their left ears. At least you will have some sort of record. Or, if the moms are already tattooed, document that and give the kids the letter "N" and a different number for each one.
Do you think collars would work?
 

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Same here on disbudding ND. In my area it's very common that all goats have horns. I understand if you go very far showing goats they would be required to be disbudded but none of our goats will end up there. We personally think it's a cruel practice. I know it's a personal choice and would never tell someone how to run their own operation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
Same here on disbudding ND. In my area it's very common that all goats have horns. I understand if you go very far showing goats they would be required to be disbudded but none of our goats will end up there. We personally think it's a cruel practice. I know it's a personal choice and would never tell someone how to run their own operation.
I get where you're coming from!! I'm sure many people do it for the safety of their herd as well as themselves, but I do understand your opinion and I respect that :)
It makes me feel better about our goats that do have horns, when I brought up disbudding it was just one more thing to add to our list of worries. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Tattoo them in the ears. Since they probably are not registered, Write down descriptions, take photos and then numerically tattoo their left ears. At least you will have some sort of record. Or, if the moms are already tattooed, document that and give the kids the letter "N" and a different number for each one.
Just curious, is there a specific reason to tattoo them on their left ear?
 

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For most of the goat registries- your farm tattoo goes in the right ear, and birth order goes in the left. If you intend to ever register any of your goats it is just easier to keep that practice. Also, if you sell your animals thru a sale and they are already tattooed- they have a better chance to become a pet as opposed to dinner. (yeah, sad thought, but goats are essentially meat animals).

I do use collars, but have had a couple tragedies with a horned goat and a collar. Mine don't have a pasture- but, if you pasture yours, collars can get caught on things.
 
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