What to feed goats?

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Kass, Apr 28, 2020.

  1. Kass

    Kass Active Member

    204
    Apr 26, 2020
    Lisbon Falls ME
    Hi guys! I will soon be getting a Saanen/ND doe and a Nubian doe, both 8 wks old. I have been looking for information on feeding, and haven't found any non-confusing answers! These are my questions.... try your best to answer... sorry I'm scatter brained...
    -I will be putting them on Dumor Goat Feed for kids and dairy goats( they will be dairy goats). Can I also add alfalfa pellets this young?
    -Do they need alfalfa pellets this young? (I do not feed alfalfa hay)
    -If not this young, when (if) should I add them? They will have some forage available.
    -How much Alfalfa pellets? How much grain?
    -Does anyone have a guideline for amounts as they get older?
    -They will need grain as they are growing, and then should I keep them on grain through the winter? They will be bred in the spring.
    THANKS!
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I start creep feeding at 2 weeks old, not all get into it but some nibble.

    Yes, through winter as well as they grow.

    How many kids are you feeding?
     

  3. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    They need a high quality hay to nibble on at all times. Alfalfa or something comparable. Do you have other options besides Dumor feed? I like to keep my doelings on milk until 4 - 6 months, so if they are not, make sure you have the best quality feed you can obtain. Creep feed, and gradually increase. Loose minerals. Fresh water. I keep growing kids on grain until they are yearlings. Know that Nubians are ususally seasonal breeders - fall through early winter.
     
    Iluvlilly! likes this.
  4. Kass

    Kass Active Member

    204
    Apr 26, 2020
    Lisbon Falls ME
    I will have a total of three. Ages 6 wks to 4 months
     
  5. Kass

    Kass Active Member

    204
    Apr 26, 2020
    Lisbon Falls ME
    For hay I just have whatever we can pick up locally... not alfalfa unfortunately. I had them on 12% sweet feed, but people were telling me it is not great for goats to be on, so I switched to Dumor, witch is the only dairy feed near me (that I can find).
    As for loose minerals, a 5 (maybe 8) pound bag is $15! Is that expensive? How long would it last between 3 goats?
     
  6. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Make sure your hay is not dusty or moldy. Ask what type it is. You may have to supplement with alfalfa pellets to get enough calcium in their diet. Hay should be free choice fed up off the ground. Goats need good loose minerals but they probably won’t eat more than a cup or two per week. Make sure it doesn’t get wet. Goats also need regular hoof trimming, check decals (poop samples) with a vet to see if they need to be treated for parasites or worms. Many of us give coccidia prevention for young kids as well. Keeping goats is not cheap - it can be surprising how fast costs can add up.
     
  7. MellonFriend

    MellonFriend Well-Known Member

    I guess the trouble is there are so many goat breeds and all are different, and each individual is just that-- individual. There isn't really a resource that is going to tell you exactly what to do when. So you will have to adjust amounts based on body condition. If they are looking a bit chubby back 'em off. If too thin... you get the idea. I started with more than my goats needed and am working to get them down to as little as I need to feed them. No reason to pay for more feed if they do well without it!;)
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Alfalfa hay is good to feed youngsters. A good 16 % protein grain, is good to feed.
    Depending on what grain you get,
    read instructions, alsways start out slowly, then, gradually increase as time goes by.