The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, some of you may have seen my thread on teaching my Pygmy goat to drive, this little guy, (Billy) seems to have something else possibly going on?
First of all, we keep our horses down the street on an 8 acre pasture in a 5 horse herd at a friends house. They have more space then us and better riding trails. Billy is actually her goat, but I have taken the time to teach him to drive. I have never paid any attention to the goats, I assumed they were fine. (Its Billy and a Fainting goat, Dutch)
Today I tied him, and started our halter training out with brushing. I was brushing him, and saw he had these huge bald spots on each side of his body.
They start in his armpit, and kinda go up above his stomach, over and ends at his back leg. He has it on both sides. There in a line, and about 2 inches wide. I though maybe because he was shedding he was pulling more hair out them usual, but I looked at it closer, and the skin is also super dry and flaky in the area. He was also scratching it, and biting at it with his teeth.
I meant to get a picture but totally forgot by the time I was done with horses. I can get one tomorrow. I sprayed horse Vetrycin on it, that is supposed to help with skin issues.

Since I have never paid any attention to him, neither does his owner, we don't feed supplements, or any kind of vitamins. He has a salt lick but nothing other then that. We also had baking soda for a bit, but it just kept getting spilled and didn't seem to be getting eaten.
I am bringing baking soda back down tomorrow, and setting it up in a more stable spot. Could this be caused by a vitamin deficiency? I'm going to do do some research on what vitamins they need to, and start providing them, so please give me advice on that as well! Thanks for reading!
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
His hair also seems wiry, but I've never pet any other goats so I guess I don't know what its supposed to feel like? It seems like it would be kind of obvious though.
I have also heard about Copper deficiencies, and before joining this forum, I tried to do some research on how to offer it, (free choice or in a supplement?) but I didn't get any clear info, and basically forgot about it. Any supplement/free choice mineral suggestions, please do tell me! Thanks!

PS. We supplement our horses with vitamins, (horse guard) in the winter, because we feed round bales which don't have much to them. Plus its good for help wit coats, Etc. I could totally be giving the supplements to Billy and Dutch as well, we have tons and I can't image they need much.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,281 Posts
First..don't offer baking soda free choice. Only give it if bloat is an issue. Goats make their own bicarbonate when they chew a cud. We don't want to interfere with this natural process. BP can also increase chance of urine any calculi as well as interfere with certain medications. ;)
Goats do need a quality loose mineral not blocks. Something like Sweet Lix Meat Maker.
Mineral def. Can cause loss of hair and coarse hair. A pic would be helpful. Being itchy could be lice, scabby skin can be mites. Post a picture of him and his skin issue so we can help narrow the problem down.

Best wishes
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First..don't offer baking soda free choice. Only give it if bloat is an issue. Goats make their own bicarbonate when they chew a cud. We don't want to interfere with this natural process. BP can also increase chance of urine any calculi as well as interfere with certain medications. ;)
Goats do need a quality loose mineral not blocks. Something like Sweet Lix Meat Maker.
Mineral def. Can cause loss of hair and coarse hair. A pic would be helpful. Being itchy could be lice, scabby skin can be mites. Post a picture of him and his skin issue so we can help narrow the problem down.

Best wishes
Awesome, thank you so much! Before this forum I saw an article on Google that said you need to offer BS free choice. Apparently that was incorrect, thanks for the info!
I have this kinda thing down on horses, chickens, etc, but Goats are totally new to me, so I definitely need this info.:) Would I check for live/mites the same way I would check on chickens? Peel the hair back and see what I see? How would I treat parasites on goats? Chickens is permethrin, dogs is a medication on the back of the neck, goats???
I'll definitely get pics tomorrow, thank you for your help!
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I could find the Sweet Lix that you suggested, but I did find other mineral blocks for goats, is there anything specific, or does it just have to be a mineral block? I do like the Kalmbach grand, so heres one I found- Amazon.com : Kalmbach Feeds Goat Mineral Block, 25 lb : Pet Supplies
Thanks for your help!
If any of these balancers/minerals will be helpful, I can get them to. -https://www.kalmbachfeeds.com/products/goat
 

·
Registered
The Monkhood
Joined
·
3,102 Posts
A loose mineral, given free choice, will allow the goats to consume what they need when wanted. Always provide a loose mineral first above all else. There are different types of blocks/mineral rocks and they can play a small role in providing additional supplements. As an example, I keep freshened loose minerals available at all times, and in addition there are 3 types of lick blocks. The added blocks/licks are used to supplement the minerals I know to be the most deficient. Even though all of this is provided, there are times when other supplements are needed in addition to what is offered. Cooper is given as a bolus when needed as an example.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,281 Posts
To check for lice...look down deep toward the skin especially in thicker hair. Goat lice is grayish with red head usually. You may also see areas the goat nibbled at to scratch and in severe cases hair can feel like cotton. Mites can not be seen without a microscope but they do leave the skin angry..crusty and loosing hair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hey guys, some of you may have seen my thread on teaching my Pygmy goat to drive, this little guy, (Billy) seems to have something else possibly going on?
First of all, we keep our horses down the street on an 8 acre pasture in a 5 horse herd at a friends house. They have more space then us and better riding trails. Billy is actually her goat, but I have taken the time to teach him to drive. I have never paid any attention to the goats, I assumed they were fine. (Its Billy and a Fainting goat, Dutch)
Today I tied him, and started our halter training out with brushing. I was brushing him, and saw he had these huge bald spots on each side of his body.
They start in his armpit, and kinda go up above his stomach, over and ends at his back leg. He has it on both sides. There in a line, and about 2 inches wide. I though maybe because he was shedding he was pulling more hair out them usual, but I looked at it closer, and the skin is also super dry and flaky in the area. He was also scratching it, and biting at it with his teeth.
I meant to get a picture but totally forgot by the time I was done with horses. I can get one tomorrow. I sprayed horse Vetrycin on it, that is supposed to help with skin issues.

Since I have never paid any attention to him, neither does his owner, we don't feed supplements, or any kind of vitamins. He has a salt lick but nothing other then that. We also had baking soda for a bit, but it just kept getting spilled and didn't seem to be getting eaten.
I am bringing baking soda back down tomorrow, and setting it up in a more stable spot. Could this be caused by a vitamin deficiency? I'm going to do do some research on what vitamins they need to, and start providing them, so please give me advice on that as well! Thanks for reading!
Is all of his coat dry or just the area with the hair loss? What is his regular diet?
How many and gender goats live in his paddock?
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A loose mineral, given free choice, will allow the goats to consume what they need when wanted. Always provide a loose mineral first above all else. There are different types of blocks/mineral rocks and they can play a small role in providing additional supplements. As an example, I keep freshened loose minerals available at all times, and in addition there are 3 types of lick blocks. The added blocks/licks are used to supplement the minerals I know to be the most deficient. Even though all of this is provided, there are times when other supplements are needed in addition to what is offered. Cooper is given as a bolus when needed as an example.
Alright, so I should offer him a loose mineral block. We have them for our horses, but I never thought about the goats needing it. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To check for lice...look down deep toward the skin especially in thicker hair. Goat lice is grayish with red head usually. You may also see areas the goat nibbled at to scratch and in severe cases hair can feel like cotton. Mites can not be seen without a microscope but they do leave the skin angry..crusty and loosing hair.
Okay, got it. I'll look for lice, if I don't find any do I treat for mites anyway? I'll take pics of his bare spots and the skin and tell you if I find anything this afternoon. What do I use to treat for mites? Would I use the same Permethrin Spray I use for chickens?
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is all of his coat dry or just the area with the hair loss? What is his regular diet?
How many and gender goats live in his paddock?
His coat seems normal in the areas without the hair loss. His regular diet is, about 3 flakes of hay for him and one other goat Dutch 1-2 times a day. He also has hay for bedding, so usually has lots of hay in the winter. In the winter we also supplement with 2 cups of Timothy pellets when there is no grass to forage. Billy and Dutch, are both male. In the summer when they can keep occupied, they go out on the 8 acre pasture with the horses, and eat the hay with the horses, so we put an extra flake out. In the winter when there's no forage they escape the pasture and come into the garage, (to break into the hay and pellets) so we have to keep him in his pen.
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Loose minerals are not in the form of a block. Loose minerals are granular and can be poured.
Oh, hmm, that seems like something I should know. We have mineral block for the horses, so I didn't know if it was the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,798 Posts
Mineral blocks made for goats are usually quite soft so they can easily bite chunks off, but I don't like them because they get wet and then the goats won't eat them so the mineral goes to waste. Also, goats love to stand on mineral blocks, so the soft ones don't hold up very long and get reduced to a pile of "loose mineral" on the ground. With a bag of loose mineral you can put out just a little at a time and when it's gone you can replenish it.

As for the missing hair, I don't have any experience with that problem. Good luck!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,281 Posts
For mites I have the best success with ivomec injectable..injected sub q 1 cc per 40 pounds once a week for 3 weeks. I had a buck who got mites every rut season...pour ons never worked for him.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weeg and MadHouse

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
For mites I have the best success with ivomec injectable..injected sub q 1 cc per 40 pounds once a week for 3 weeks. I had a buck who got mites every rut season...pour ons never worked for him.
Interesting, I do want something to work, and have had chickens with mites, and that proved a difficult pest to get rid of. Can you buy the Ivomec at the feeds store? I have needles and syringes available to use.
 

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I already have the Durvet, Permethrin spray on hand, so I'll start with that and go from there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,281 Posts
Yes I get ivomec injectable at feed store. Need an 18 g needle and 3/4 inch long. You can also use nustock or MTG for horses for topical treatment along with the injectable. Ivomec does sting so expect a reaction if you go that route
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weeg

·
Registered
We have two horses, and flock of chickens and ducks. I also enjoy keeping tabs on a friends goats.
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes I get ivomec injectable at feed store. Need an 18 g needle and 3/4 inch long. You can also use nustock or MTG for horses for topical treatment along with the injectable. Ivomec does sting so expect a reaction if you go that route
Okay, I'll start with the spray I have, and if I need to do more I'll go for the injectable. Thank you!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top