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We have always had our goats outside all winter. They have a large quanzot hut they can get in out of the elements. But, we do have a barn which mostly goes unused during the winter and then we will move goats in there as they start kidding. I'm thinking of locking everyone inside this winter. Maybe give the pasture the winter to rest? It will definitely be more upkeep if they're inside but it will also be easier on them I guess if they aren't fighting as much to stay warm and dry.
 

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We keep ours in the stalls in the winter. My dad cut holes in the doors, then screwed clear floor mats over the holes, which act a a doggy door. That way there is no wind drafts, but they ca still get in and out.
 

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Raising Quality Show & Commercial Goats
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Mine eat their hay around the barn during the winter months. Nothing in the pastures for them to eat. I keep mine in a paddock area with access to the barn & houseing. I find I sweep alot more inthe winter. Than any other time. And Spring clean up is really gross! Taking out the layers that were built up over the winter. But nighttime, mine are locked in the barns or houseing. The coyotes around here get hungry & brave. So the LGDS are locked up with thd goats inside. Every morning, they all run.out to go potty & 1st at the hay! Lol 😜 🤪
 

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In the winter is when mine start to kid so I move panels around the barn so they are in a more dry lot area. It’s easier for me to check them and I also want to give the one pasture time to grow up. They have access to two different shelters, one is where I put stalls up as they kid and when they are in labor or have kidded then I stall them for about 24 hours. Mine when they can if it’s not too wet or cold they like to stay outside even at night. I think they feel safer being able to keep a eye on things.
Be careful about locking them up tight, the ammonia smell can add up fast and can make them sick. But if this is something you want to try then try it. I know a lot of people back East that have terrible winters and keep theirs locked up. I personally just like mine to be out and about and don’t want the added cleaning, but what works for one doesn’t work for all
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In the winter is when mine start to kid so I move panels around the barn so they are in a more dry lot area. It’s easier for me to check them and I also want to give the one pasture time to grow up. They have access to two different shelters, one is where I put stalls up as they kid and when they are in labor or have kidded then I stall them for about 24 hours. Mine when they can if it’s not too wet or cold they like to stay outside even at night. I think they feel safer being able to keep a eye on things.
Be careful about locking them up tight, the ammonia smell can add up fast and can make them sick. But if this is something you want to try then try it. I know a lot of people back East that have terrible winters and keep theirs locked up. I personally just like mine to be out and about and don’t want the added cleaning, but what works for one doesn’t work for all
Our winters can get very cold but it is usually only January and February that are bad. Maybe December. I was thinking of just keeping them inside during those months. November is not bad at all and usually by March it's starting to warm up.

I do have a paddock that is attached to the barn and has a roof. This is where I keep them at night. So they can still get outside but they're a little more secure than just being in the pasture. I can leave the one barn door open that leads to that area so they could get into the paddock during the day and then stall them at night and close everything up. Then if it is supposed to get particularly cold even during the day they could just stay inside on those days.
 

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Our winters can get very cold but it is usually only January and February that are bad. Maybe December. I was thinking of just keeping them inside during those months. November is not bad at all and usually by March it's starting to warm up.

I do have a paddock that is attached to the barn and has a roof. This is where I keep them at night. So they can still get outside but they're a little more secure than just being in the pasture. I can leave the one barn door open that leads to that area so they could get into the paddock during the day and then stall them at night and close everything up. Then if it is supposed to get particularly cold even during the day they could just stay inside on those days.
That's what we do in Minnesnota lol... it can get really cold and we keep them in the "barn" it's really a garage but it's turned into their barn. We have 2 10 by 10 stalls that we separate the 6 in... not ideal but keeps them nice and warm. I might try letting them out this year though on the warm days, would be good for them. Now my cousin leaves hers out with no problem, I'm just paranoid.
 

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Ours have barn access in the winter, they can come and go. If it's really nasty out we'll lock them in especially at night. The only time we usually stall them is if they are close to kidding or have kids on them.
This is exactly what we do!!
 

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Mine are never locked in the barn unless there is an immense blizzard then I will close the doors at night. The exercise is so imperative to preventing pneumonia and pregnancy issues. I shovel paths in the snow for them if needed. They have free access to outdoors at all times.
 

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Mine are never locked in the barn unless there is an immense blizzard then I will close the doors at night. The exercise is so imperative to preventing pneumonia and pregnancy issues. I shovel paths in the snow for them if needed. They have free access to outdoors at all times.
Yes, I agree!! We do the same thing for our goaties!!
 

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We never lock ours up. We have mild winters with maybe a literal handful of freezing nights. They have a shelter and they do just fine in there on those nights. Otherwise, they have free reign of their pens. They live with 4 LGD and then another guard dog that patrols the main property.
 
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