Whether won't eat, staying away from herd

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by CaramelKittey, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Hi all!
    Our 6 year old kinder whether, Liam, hasn't been eating his feed the past few days. I haven't noticed him eating hay, but he might be when I'm not there. He gets 1/2 cup of feed twice a day. He also gets orchard grass hay, and plenty of grass/browse. He is fed Dumor goat pelleted formula. Here is a picture of the bag. He has also has been staying behind his shed, which is very unusual for him. Is there anything I can do for him? I will try to get pictures when I get home. He is very skittish, but a little friendlier lately. He is usually hand-fed, as the other goats try to take his food. We recently tested our herd and he tested negative for CAE, Brucellosis, Johne's, and CL. None of our other goats are acting like this. I can't get to him to check his FAMACHA, but I will try when I get home. I'll check his temperature as well if I can.
    [​IMG]
    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    I would definitely check for worms/parasites and try to get a temp. Is he peeing? His calcium to phosphorous ratio seems high on the phosphorous for a wether. Ratio should be 2 parts calcium to one part phosphorous. Orchard grass is typically high in phosphorous and the dumor cannot balance that out.
     

  3. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Thank you! I'll definetly try to get a temp, and if possible, get a fecal done. We have alfalfa pellets for our does. Should we start to give him some? How much?
    It seems like he has had a little more trouble peeing than usual. This has never happened before with him, but we did recently get new hay. Maybe this new hay has more phosphorous than usual in it? Our old hay wasn't great quality. Our new hay is better, but not the best.
     
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  4. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Start with his famacha and temp and watch to see him pee. Goatblessings is correct..he needs more calcium in his diet. Once he's eating again, I would ween him off his feed switching with the alfalfa pellets. Just add a cup of alfalfa pellets to his feed..begin adding more alfalfa and less feed over a weeks time until hes getting all alfalfa pellets and no feed.
     
  5. Tanya

    Tanya Well-Known Member

    @CaramelKittey I am sorry he is not feel8ng well. I hope you can find out whats going on soon.
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with the others.

    Sorry he is not feeling good.
     
  7. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

  8. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Whatever it is, I hope you figure it out soon and he gets back to being himself!
     
  9. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki

    Like others here his calcuim to phos ratio is off. Does it seem like he is standing as if to pee a lot? You know the stance. Just the standin a lot and being away from the herd would make me think stones ... i would start him on ammonium chloride asap! Most likely you need to order that. Fruit fresh in the canning isle will work in a pinch. You do NOT want him to get blocked! So you need to figure out a way to get him contained to check him now. Feel around his penis and see if you feel gritty sandy feeling stuff there. That is uc stones in the making.
     
  10. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    I tried to give him a handful of alfalfa pellets yesterday and he did eat it, but then spit some out..
    He did eat his grain yesterday though. Thank you so much! I’ll definitely give him alfalfa pellets with his feed this morning!
     
  11. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Yes. He seems to be having trouble pooping though, but it’s hard to tell.
     
  12. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Thank you!
    I have seen him standing to pee more than often, but he isn’t standing all the time.
    Will canned pineapple work?
     
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  13. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    No. It needs to be fruit fresh. Or better ammonium chloride.
     
  14. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    often we see what looks like a constipated buck but in reality he's struggling to pee. Since he is still able to pee..quick action is needed to keep things flowing. Rry fresh fruit for now but order Ammonium chloride to be his daily maintenance. Keep a very close eye on him..if he stops peeing it becomes an emergency situation. Call your vet now and alert him. They may even have Ammonium chloride on hand.
     
  15. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    I noticed on the picture of the feed bag that it has added ammonium chloride in it. Does that mean, likely it wasn’t enough for this boy, if he is having the beginnings of UC?
    Also I remembered @CaramelKittey, that you had offered free choice baking soda before. Do you still do that? This was from @Damfino
    From what I understand, baking soda has an alkalizing effect on the urine which means it should not be a regular part of the diet for wethers.
    From this thread:

    https://www.thegoatspot.net/threads/urinary-calculi-treatment-analysis-myths-and-tips.215929/
     
  16. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    This is from tennesee meat goats:
    https://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/urinarycalculi06.html. Good luck!
    Mix the following in 20 cc water and orally drench: One (1) teaspoon Ammonium chloride per 75 lbs bodyweight every 12 hours for 2 days, then 1/2 tsp per 75 lbs bodyweight every 12 hours for the next 3 days, then 1/2 tsp once a day for 3 days, then 1/4 tsp daily as a preventative. Dosages are based upon 75 lb liveweights. Ammonium chloride burns the throat, so stomach tube it into the goat. You can ammonium chloride with juice to avoid burning if you must orally drench.
     
  17. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Thank you! He is with our does and they all have free choice baking soda available. He ate his feed with the alfalfa pellets this morning! He didn’t eat all of it, but at least half. He was given 1/2 cup of feed with 1 cup of alfalfa pellets. Is this correct?
    I definitely think our new hay must be higher in phosphorous. We’ve only had a small case that cured itself once a couple years ago when a buckling got into the doe’s feed. No treatment was needed, thankfully.
    I’ll take away their baking soda, and keep an eye on him. Thank you!
     
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  18. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Thank you! I’ve never heard of or used a stomach tube. How does it work, and where could I find one? Should I mix it with cranberry juice? Liam loves apples, will that work for some quick ammonium chloride? How much should I give him?
    Thank you!
     
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  19. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Mix the following in 20 cc water and orally drench: One (1) teaspoon Ammonium chloride per 75 lbs bodyweight every 12 hours for 2 days,
    You can (mix) ammonium chloride with juice to avoid burning if you must orally drench.

    :up:
    If you use juice you don’t have to stomach tube, that’s how I understand it.
    I don’t know which juice is best, apple or cranberry.