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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm going to go look at some Boer goats tomorrow and hopefully bring some home. I've had NDs for years and would now like to add some meat goats since we have the space and have been getting a good price on our excess ND bucklings taken to butcher. I was hoping to get some optinions on which does have the better conformation as I'm still not great at figuring that out. Thanks in advance.

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The first pic is of a Boer/savanna cross. She is 5 months old.

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2) Fullblood Boer doe bred to a fullblood buck.
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3) info same as 2
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4) 88% bred to fullblood Boer buck

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5) 2 yo fullblood doe bred to full blood buck
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6) 4yo fullblood bred to fullblood buck. 1x1 teats good mother.
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7) 94% 1x1 correct teats. Good mother
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8) 94% 2yo never exposed to buck
2x2 teats
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9) 5 month 3/4 Boer 1/4 ND
 

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I really like the buck.
He has good topline, strong pasterns, decent hip, round rump.

From all the doe's, I honestly like the mostly black doe and black and white one the best.
I do see mineral deficiencies and a fishtail there.
Those two look the healthiest and the best conformation. They may need to be wormed and treated for cocci but a fecal will tell you for sure. Check for lice too.

All the others have too drastic drop in the tailhead. Looks to possibly have worms or have cocci and skinny, with mineral deficiencies.
 

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The first doe looks extremely stunted and wormy. She unfortunately looks like she is 2 months rather than 5. If these are all from the same farm, I’d be cautious about bringing a lot of worms to your property. The nicest and healthiest ones look to be #2, #5, #6, #8, and the last buck you sent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1 & 9 are from the same farm. They are bottle raised.

7&8 are from the same farm.

2, 3, 4, 5, & 6 are from the same farm.

And the buck if from a different farm too.

Goats for sale are never close to were I live so I like to check out several places when I travel before buying. The buck is actually the closest a good goat has ever been from me. Only 1 1/2 hours away.
 

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From those pictures, I like 7,8, and the Buck.

But you can only tell so much from a picture, especially a candid picture. Ask the owners how they are raised, and see if it matches what you want to be able to provide.

I don't like 1 and 9, except as rescues. You'll be putting some money into them... Not really what you want to do.
 
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Does the drop in tail head lead to kidding problems?
It can. Also indicates weak rear udder attachments. Strong udder attachments are still important in meat goats, because of longevity issues. The least expensive goats are the ones you already own. So if they are productive for a long time, the cheaper that production is for you.

That's how I see it, anyway.
 

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It can. Also indicates weak rear udder attachments. Strong udder attachments are still important in meat goats, because of longevity issues. The least expensive goats are the ones you already own. So if they are productive for a long time, the cheaper that production is for you.

That's how I see it, anyway.
It doesn't always, or even most of the time, indicate weak rear udder attachments. I have several steep rumped does that have fantastic udder attachments, and have seen a whole lot more.

I also have never had much faith in the "steep rump = kidding problems" argument. If it did, why does the rump get extremely steep when the does are in labor? It must, on the contrary, serve a useful function.
 

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I also have never had much faith in the "steep rump = kidding problems" argument. If it did, why does the rump get extremely steep when the does are in labor? It must, on the contrary, serve a useful function.
Yes, I have heard over the years that too straight and too steep of a rump are both causes for kidding issues. You want a perfect balance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the replies. I haven't made a decision on any of the does yet but I did decide to buy the buck. He was bred by Cedar Hawk Ranch in California. The picture of him is when he was 3 months old. He will be one year old in a few days. He will be delivered Tuesday afternoon and I'll post some updates pics of him then. The nice man who bought him from his Breeder & had him shipped out here to Oklahoma gave him 20 does to breed and is planning on keeping most of his daughters. So he's moving him on to someone else before winter. I don't mind feeding him through the winter! Lol! I think he will be with me for quite a few winters. Really excited about it. But my family is teasing me for buying a buck when I don't have any does yet. I had to remind them that I have 3 grade dairy does to cross him with even if I don't buy any Boer does.

Oh and here is an updated picture of doe #1. I don't think she was 5 months old when the first photo was taken. Do you guys still think she looks stunted? (That's a Nubian doe in the background of the photo if that helps with sizing).

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