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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my young wethers has a terribly scuffy looking coat. He is one of four in the barn and none of the others have the same problem. He has been de-wormed so that shouldn't be the problem. (Worms were my first susupect, but he is on the same de-worming schedule as the others) He is about 4 months old and it looks like he has "cow-licks" all over his body. All the other goat's fur lie flat to their body...but not his. I want to make sure there is no underlying health issue that is causing this. Beyond wanting to find out what is ailing him, I am concerened because his fur is not flat to his body and is sticking up in every direction that he may not be able to insulate himself well during the upcoming winter months. Tonight is the first night of snow here in NH. I have a feeling I will be going out to the barn at about Midnight, "just to check on things". (GDS)

Thanks in advance
 

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Hello,

I would have a fecal exame done - only for him. There are always some goats in a herd/population that are more prone to parasitic infections than others and MAY need another worming schedule.

External parasites can be another cause: lice, mites - have you checked for those?

Mineral/trace mineral deficiencies: cobalt, thiamine, sulfur, other B-vitamins.

Is he a single breed goat or a mix?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Birch does have access to minerals. None of the boys seem to be interested in them at all. I have checked for external parasites....nothing. I could potentially MAKE him take some minerals by making them more appetizing. I will try to give him some in a treat today.

Also, I don't know if this is related. When the boys would go for hikes with me, Birch was always the one picking up the rear. I think it is just his "comfort zone", but it could have been lethargy. Any thoughts? Could this be another symptom of lack of minerals?

How do I make sure that the Boys are taking their minerals and if so,who is taking them. I have two mineral feeders that are both in common areas. Is the best thing to do is wait for someone to show symptoms of a deficiency?
 

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Hello,

I repeat, have a fecal exam done on Birch. You may want to have some bloodwork done, as well. If there's a major mineral deficiency, it will show (but only major ones!!).

About mineral feed: there are mixtures the goats simply don't like. Maybe if you switch to another one, this might change.

I know that the sweet licks are controversial - because of the molasses - but I have the best acceptance since I use licks with a molasses base (the goats don't overindulge but they get what they need).

Do you feed grain or other concentrates? At 4 months age they still need a lot of energy to grow and hay, browse, pasture alone don't provide then in many cases (depends on where you live and the quality of your feed).

About letharg/picking up the rear: there are goats that like to go last. Does he play with the other goats or is he laid back there, too?

Have you checked his weight? Is he alright under all his fur or is he thin, with ribs and spine poking out?
 

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Lice would be my first guess sue to the cowlicks. They are usually from the goat scratching with his teth and leaving some saliva there.

I''d treat with a permethrin spray or poultry dust. I'd also have a fecal for cocci in addition to the regular worm fecal.

Young goats should have loose trace minerals. They can't get enough from a block. Sweetlix is a good mix but make sure you get the meatmaker version. 16:8.
 
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