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7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, guys! I needle felt and enjoy it very much, but I was wondering. The wool I'm using was donated to me from a pair of rescued sheep. I wash it three times with laundry detergent. If it remains white, that is all I do. When I dye, it is dyed with store dye and vinegar.

I'm a little paranoid about disease. The goats aren't in contact with the wool or the little creatures I make, but is there a way I would give it to them through, say, laying the wool on my lap, then the goats chew on my clothes?

I'm so paranoid, I'm sorry. :laugh:
 

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I wouldn't think so. But if it would make you feel better, I would have one pair of clothes when you work on your needle crafts and only wear the clothes then. Change before going out to the goats.
 

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Once washing and especially after dyeing, there shouldn't be anything left in the fleece that is dangerous. It's usually the poop that might have something in it when you're looking at fleece so once that is all gone it should be completely safe.

My job is around fleece and fibers. I wear an apron working with raw fleece and make sure to not wear that apron out of the fleece area and I wash up after working with it all.
 

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Also...
you know that bleach melts wool right? It's actually kind of cool. It's not instant but it does. Also Peroxide (oxi-clean) will also dissolve wool. So don't use that stuff. You can vinegar it all though as that is safe. Citric Acid is really good too.
 

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I'm not addicted - I'm in love!
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According to the vet I talked to at the Johne's lab, the disease is far less contagious than many people think. Pretty much the only way an animal ever gets the disease, is by being exposed at a young age to the manure of an animal that is shedding a significant amount of bacteria. However, anything can happen; it's a matter of probabilities. The probability of your animals getting it from the wool is extremely low.
Oh, and by the way, the people at the Johne's lab also told me that bleach doesn't kill Johne's bacteria! The germs are that tough.
I think, considering the seriousness of the disease, it is reasonable to take some precautions (i.e hand washing if you have young kids on your property), but you don't need to obsess about it.
 

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7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you, milkmaid! I know I can't protect them from anything, evidently they can even catch it from deer. But I want to be sure I'm doing what I can. :)
 

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I'm not addicted - I'm in love!
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You're welcome. :) That last sentence is entirely my opinion, I forgot to say. It's only worth :2cents: after all. :)
 
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