Worming

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by StaceyRosado, Oct 6, 2007.

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  1. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    How often a goat needs to be wormed depends on its geographic location, feed lot, number of goats around and its stressed condition.

    If fed on a dry lot the need for worming goes down. If on a wet lot (grass) the need for worming goes up. If you location is very wet or local breeders are experiencing worm problems in their cattle horses or goats chances are you are as well.

    To check a goat for worms, look at their eye lids and gums. A healthy goat’s will look pink, a wormy goat will have pale pink to white/gray

    To know what kinds of worms you are dealing with you can take a stool sample to the vet. Even a dog and cat vet can run a stool sample and let you know what kinds of worms you are dealing with and if the goat/s have worms at all.

    Loose clumpy to runny stools can be an indication of a worm overload. All goats will have some degree of worms, but when the goat gets stressed they can’t fight them off as easily and then are susceptible to getting an overload. Anemia can result. Treating an anemic goat isn’t always easy. Having some kind of iron injection or iron supplement is good to have on hand.

    Worms I recommend (but seek someone in your area who is familiar with what works and doesn’t work for your geographic location because in some areas worms have become resistant to certain wormers………a vet may also be able to recommend a wormer for you)

    Safeguard – works for tape worms, use it 3 days in a row (use at 3 times the dosage when using cattle or horse wormer)
    Ivermectin – safe even for pregnant does
    Verbazon – do not give during first 3 months of pregnancy.
    Cydectin - not personally familiar with this wormer, hear it is strong but effective
    Decomax – I hear this is a good wormer, and safe for kids as well, no personal use of the product to share.

    If using a horse wormer paste it is best to triple the goats weight and then dial the dosage, especially with safeguard.

    Worming every 3 or so months is a good average for maintenance worming.
     
    Jane Cross likes this.
  2. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    I would like to say that with the Goat Safeguard, you still have to triple the doseage and do it for three days.
     

  3. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) Guest

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
  4. HollowbeadRanch

    HollowbeadRanch New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    NW Alabama
    I use Cydectin and Ivermectin. I myself prefer the Ivermectin. I know that Cydectin is 1cc per 11lbs. and for the Ivermectin my vet advised me to use 1cc per 50lbs. (note this is using the liquid wormer). Others may use different amounts.. I am just saying this is what we use. And like Stacey said we worm every 2-3 months, but some people prefer not to keep them on a schedule and only worm when needed. I guess it is strictly by personal preference.
     
  5. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) Guest

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    Just be careful with worming on a schedule. If the goat doesn't need it, the worms will build up resistance to the wormer faster and there haven't been any new classes of wormers in a long time. The other thing is if you have weanlings during July adn August (and Sept this year), you need to check them often. They are very susceptable to barber pole worms and can go down fast - a couple of days.

    I do understand worming every 2 to 3 months makes it easy to keep track of, but you could end up without an effective wormer in a couple of years.

    As a backup to Cydectin, we've been using Levamisole. It's not used much anymore so it effective.
     
    aJadeMagnolia and bamaherd like this.
  6. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    We worm holistically with black walnut and copper year round(please only do the black walnut if you are experienced and understand how to use it) and in the spring after the does kid we give a triple dose of Safeguard three days in a row do those that need it, and in the fall 1 month before breeding season we give those that need it Valbazen. Safeguard is still effective around here and I only worm when there is a need to. If you worm on a schedule, like Julie said you are helping the parasites build up resistance to the worms but you are also just wasting money.
     
  7. fcnubian

    fcnubian New Member

    764
    Oct 22, 2007
    I have a question...How does Safeguard kill tapes in goats but not in horses?
     
  8. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I have no idea how it works.

    I just know that Panicure (the actual drug) works against tapeworms. Safeguard is a form of Panicure.
     
  9. fcnubian

    fcnubian New Member

    764
    Oct 22, 2007
    Ok. Thanks for replying. I'll ask the vet we use next time he's out. :D Since it doesn't kill tapes in horses, that is why I'm skeptical about it killing them in goats....lol. I dont use safeguard any more anyways so I don't really have to worry about that. Lol
     
  10. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    it isn't effective in all areas so a stronger version of Pancure (sp?) is advised when trying to kill tapes. Unfortunatly I forgot the name of the wormer, I will try to remember and then post it here.
     
  11. fcnubian

    fcnubian New Member

    764
    Oct 22, 2007
    Ok

    I have used Safeguard in both the goats and horses and it doesn't work for either of them which is why I am switching wormers. :D
     
  12. sunshineandtulip

    sunshineandtulip New Member

    46
    Nov 5, 2007
    Missouri Ozarks
    Panacur is the brand name of fenbendazole(sp?) which is also Safeguard(just not as strong as Panacur)
    Panacur has been used so widely that is is ineffective in a lot of places. I know here that our vet gives it for Everything! And last spring had me giving it every 2 weeks for 3 months to my goats!! I will not go through that again! So I am switching out to Ivomec(ivermectrin) and Cydectin(moxidectin). I have used Valbazen(albendazole) for my bucks and wethers. They are not in the same pen as the goat girls and it says not to use in the 1st 45 days of pregnancy(cows and sheep). It seemed to work really well but I wont use it on my pregnant girls. I plan on using the cydectin the day after they have their babies. But this is all just my opinion and what I have found out through my experience. After losing one to parasites and almost losing another It makes you a little paranoid....
    ~Tonia
     
  13. Scott

    Scott Guest

    36
    Oct 8, 2007
    Can we add the amount of de-wormer per pound to this forum. I've been using Cydectin for a while now and I'm getting ready to switch to a different class for a while just to prevent resistance. My dosage for Cydectin was:

    Cydectin: 1cc per 20 lb. Some people are using it at 1cc per 10 lb.
     
  14. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I have never used Cydectin so I can't give you an answer on that. Maybe someone else who has can.
     
  15. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    I use herbal wormer. But it is nice to know the amounts of the chemical wormers when I need them....
     
  16. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    Well I will post what amounts I know.

    feel free to post what you know for the dosage of wormers
     
  17. Patty13637

    Patty13637 Guest

    8
    Nov 22, 2007
    Do not switch wormers until they are no longer working . By switching back and forth soon you will have nothing that works .

    the only way to know if its working is to fecal worm and then fecal about 10 days later .

    Patty
     
    aJadeMagnolia likes this.
  18. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    the reason I use two wormers is to get all the worms.

    Example:
    ivermectin gets just about all worms except tape worms. I use Safeguard (still effective here) for the tape worms.

    Plus here is the way it was discribed to me and it makes sense.

    you worm you goat - it only gets rid of the "weaker" worms. You have some more strong worms that live on. They reproduce and so forth. You keep worming with the same wormer and eventually you will end up with only these 'strong" worms or aka "resistant worms" They are only resistant to the one wormer.

    To avoid this you worm with your regular wormer then every couple wormings switch it up and kill off those "strong" worms with a wormer that they are "weak" too.

    This will keep your wormers effective for a much longer period of time.

    this is how it was described to me and it just makes sense for me.
     
    Kbennj, Goat town and K Gemmill like this.
  19. Scott

    Scott Guest

    36
    Oct 8, 2007
    I was only wanting to create a list of dosages for all types of wormers (safeguard, ivermectin, etc.). Just an FYI for all of the different types of deworming chemicals that are out.
     
  20. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
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