Young corgy needs to be caprine kid friendly

Discussion in 'Other Pets' started by goatlover, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. goatlover

    goatlover New Member

    25
    Mar 6, 2009
    ID
    Hello all,
    As of last night we have 10 new little Newbian babies and 2 La Newbas(we have yet to acquire a La Mancha buck)! YAY! :leap: However, as of this winter we acquired a new addition to the family in the form of a somewhat energetic, though very sweet, Permbroke Welsh Corgi, and now that we have a couple of the bottle babies around the house and in the yard she is very interested in them, however I am not sure what her intentions are :? . She plays rough with the barn cats so I am not sure what she is doing when she licks her incessantly- non stop really- and even nips a little. Any ideas what her behavior means and how I can teach her to be gentle with the babies?
     
  2. OhCee

    OhCee Yak Lady

    609
    Feb 26, 2010
    Western MT
    Corgis are sheep/goat herders. They are not to be left with goats unattended. They are NOT guardian breeds. They are driven to nip and herd because of their prey drive.

    Just supervise closely. I personally wouldn't let her in with babies- just the adults. I had a cardigan welsh corgi (the bigger ones with tails).

    If you see her getting fixated or too rough. tap her on the bum and make a strange noise (not a word command) to distract her. You can pet her slowly and teach her a command word like 'gentle' or something while she's calm. If she gets too excited, tap her bum. Is she trained with basic obedience commands?
     

  3. goatlover

    goatlover New Member

    25
    Mar 6, 2009
    ID
    yeah she knows her basic commands- sit, stay, come, lay down etc. along with a few other things. But for training can we teach her to keep them in a certain area for grazing or can they mostly just learn driving techniques? (since I know that's what they are bred for)
     
  4. OhCee

    OhCee Yak Lady

    609
    Feb 26, 2010
    Western MT
    Herding breeds require supervision and are not a substitute for fencing, if that's what you mean. She will play/chase/nip/even bite. The problem is, without proper (extensive at times) training, that can result in death of your goats. Not to mention, having a herding dog around all day will raise stress in all animals involved, which can lead to higher susceptibility to health issues, injury, and general unrest in your herd.