Your Advice Would Be Nice

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Lexibot, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Hi, I am Lexi, at least that's my internet name. I started goat farming in December. Living and learning, we seem to be managing for newbies.

    We started off with a herd of 5 pretty wild pregnant does, we got them in a rush (not prepared at all), but they were very cheap and we couldn't pass them up. I did pretty well with them, got everything suggested to get, they survived were healthy and had their babies. Unfortunately, though, it was MASSIVELY cold here, and they wouldn't take care of their babies. I ended up closing 6 babies in my 4x3 shower and bottle feed them (one died due to an alleged of Floppy Kid Syndrome... at least we GUESS). It was a nightmare, and after a week of labour pains, crying kids, and 4 hours of sleep, we decided to sell them. We kept one baby cause his legs were weak and didn't think it would be fair to sell him to someone. He's a pet now, we call him Splints or Goat Goat.

    We've come a long far since December. We now have 11 goats, a new herd. 2 Kikos, 1 Nubian/Boer cross, 2 Full Blooded Boers and 5 Nubians.

    Recently though, we've been having a problem with a goat in particular. A 5 month boer goat, We bought her when she was only 2 months old, and she is just NOT growing. She has less muscle than Goat Goat. Goat Goat is a wethered dairy goat. And the female just seems soooo scrawny. I am not sure what to do.

    We have Goat (full of copper and selenium), Mineral, and Salt Blocks.We have TRIED loose mineral, our area does NOT sell it, these are just what we're stuck with... We feed them all grain (oats, chopped corn, and molasses). We don't have a pasture yet, so they eat wooded land. I live in Missouri, lots of weeds. lol.

    We have hay lined up to be delivered for them. But is there anything that I could try for them? Please take note, we're pretty poor farmers, and we are NOT doing this for BREEDING or SHOWING. These goats are for farm use only, to eat and milk. Unfortunately, we can't pay for vets, and lets face it, the bill is worth more than the goat if you're raising it for personal use. I love my animals a lot and we try as much as we can to avoid animal loss.

    So if you have any advice, I would really like it.

    Avoid a lot of criticism, I have spent a lot of time researching and learning, just would like to know if I can do anything for the little one.

    Thanks alot!

    Lexi from South East Missouri
     
  2. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
     

  3. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Have you treated her cocci? Since you don't want to use the vet...which I don't blame you...they can get very expensive. Most vets can run a stool sample for like $10, some more, some less...but if you don't want to do that I would recommend treating her for cocci. It is pretty common and easily stunts a kid's growth if they become overloaded on it. You can get a packet of Di-Methox from http://www.jefferslivestock.com and treat her for a week and hopefully that will help her. You also should probably deworm if you haven't already. Other than that...good hay, minerals, and fresh water will help her keep her weight up. Also, if you're in a hot climate...good shade always helps and during winter months lots of warm shelter. When kids aren't growing well though and you are caring and feeding appropriately then cocci is always something I check for. ;)
     
  4. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    hi Lexi and welcome! No criticism here! I soooo know what it's like to have money issues. We just made arrangements to get 3 new does, but my husband may lose his job after this week <farm relocating to another state>, so we are letting two go back :( Until we know what is going to happen, we can't afford to take them on as they are pregnant. Darn shame too they are adorable!
    So yep I know what it's like.

    As for your goat, has she been wormed? And if so, with what? I don't know much about goats really, so otherwise I don't know what kind of advice to offer than starting with worming first.
    I am sure the other wonderful people on here can give great tips and advice :)

    BTW, I am so very sorry about the problems you had with the first goat experience, sounds very dramatic. I am glad to hear you are getting back into it :)
     
  5. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri



    Yes, we bought her from a breeder, she's 100% boer. The breeder tested her, and everything. I personally haven't though. Perhaps I might have her retested. Her "sister" is doing really well, probably a little under sized, but that could be just what we feed her.

    I heard it's a waste to test for Cocci, as even if the goat has it, there's still a chance of it reoccurring. We figured it was just a way for vets to make an additional profit. $10 just to KNOW if my goat has an issue would be worth it though.
     
  6. Polarhug

    Polarhug New Member

    263
    Jul 1, 2010
    Southcentral Alaska
    Welcome Lexi! You'll get tons of good help here :)
     
  7. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    coccidia is a parasite and yes it can come back.

    The thing with coccidia is since its a parasite you NEED to get rid of it or it will kill the goat. Ive had it happen before and its not pleasant. I have pulled very sick goats through it too.

    You need to treat her and her sister for it since if one goat has it more then likely they both do.

    worms are also a parasite that can kill a goat - just had it happen to a kid last week. Its devistating and I keep a very clean and healthy herd but it still can happen when the kids are stressed from moving or changes in their lives.

    A fecal will tell you what you are dealing with - a local cat and dog vet can run a fecal (stool sample) to check for coccidia and worms. This will tell you what you are looking at dealing with and what wormer to be using so its effective or if you need to treat for coccidia.

    Once you have worms or cocci then you will always be battling it when wet weather is abundant especially.

    Goats are prone to worms and coccidia its up to us as owners to be on top of it and properly treat them when needed.

    Hope she pulls through for you
     
  8. newtopygmies

    newtopygmies New Member

    59
    May 26, 2010
    ashville alabama
    I don't know much about goats either...But the first thing I look at is the tail...If my goat has a tail that is sticking straight up in the air, and the animal is active, sociable (some are more sociable than others) I don't worry too much.

    I may be doing the wrong thing but I use medicated feed to worm and treat for cocci. So far my goats are healthy (beginers luck maybe). I used to raise tropical fish and clamped fins were always a bad sign ...I guess that is why I always look at my goaties tails. The other thing i learned from tropical fish is that you can worry them to death. When I quit trying to get everything perfect according to the "experts" I had much better luck...and live fish!

    Good luck with your new friends!!

    Mine got kinda thin before they got fat. Now they are all fat. But they act like they are starving.
     
  9. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Thanks for your replies, I will see what I can do. None of my goats seem to be LOSING weight. She just doesn't seem to be GAINING it. Her face is filling out, but that's about it, lol :D

    OT:
    Is there a certain post count I have to get before not having a mod's approval to post? Just wondering :D
     
  10. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Wow...you really got thrown into the world of goats!! Sorry you ended up with such wild ones and lost a kid.

    Even if your goats have the woods to browse, they should get hay as well...and Ivermectin paste is a good wormer, it will take care of the common problem parasites except tapeworms, the paste is pretty cheap too Tractor Supply carries tubes for around $3 each. Depends on the number of goats you have as far as how many tubes you'll need as the goats will need to be dosed again 10 days later.

    Coccidia is best to be treated, it's not something a vet will make up just to get more $, it is deadly to kids and even if they survive an overload, chances are the damage to their intestine will leave them unable to absorb nutrients from any food they are given, leaving them stunted and sickly looking.

    Any treatment for Cocci prevention or outbreak is best given individually, this is to ensure each is getting the exact dose , mass feeding a topdress or even providing medicated water does not ensure that each is getting what they need.

    I hope this herd does better for you than the one you started with.
     
  11. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    if she isnt gaining that means something is stunting her growth - meaning its keeping her from growing. and in my experience parasites are what do that: worms and coccidia.


    Yes you need over 25 posts before you dont have to have them approved.
     
  12. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Thanks for your information. So far this herd has been doing great minus this little one. I'll see what's up with her. Hopefully nothing major... I really like her.
     
  13. MiGoat

    MiGoat New Member

    304
    Apr 21, 2010
    West Michigan
    Hi Lexi! I understand about no vet stuff for sure.
    I would get rid of the salt block and give the loose mineral only. I've read they'll use the salt and not the mineral if available thus not getting enough of the goodies.

    I'd cocci treat too.
     
  14. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    That's weird...My goats lick off the mineral more than the salt. And they really love the "Goat Block" I put out there. Loose mineral is not available here, we've tried to get it :(
     
  15. MiGoat

    MiGoat New Member

    304
    Apr 21, 2010
    West Michigan
    Well then that will do! We can only do what we can. I often think "sheesh in 3rd world countries goats survive without all the fussing we do!" LOL
     
  16. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Well I think that's mostly cause they may have better mineral levels. I know Missouri is HORRIBLE for ANYTHING... so we need a lot of additions. Missouri is pretty much crap land. Horrible soil, horrible pests, horrible weather, and horrible plants.

    I often think "If deer run wild and survive, why can't my goat?" And maybe we just want better quality than the 3rd world countries.